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Old 06-15-2015, 06:57 AM   #1
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How do I keep it cold?

Sorry if this has been asked before but I couldn't find an answer. I just bought a SLX 195RB and it has a 2 way (gas or electric) fridge. My old 154 had a 3 way and we used the battery feature to keep the fridge cold on the road. Can I use the electric feature to keep the new fridge cold on the road? I know it wouldn't be on shore power but there is an inverter in the system. The lights work when we stopped for lunch but I had shut the fridge off as it didn't have the battery feature.

Thanks for any help

reddz
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Old 06-15-2015, 07:34 AM   #2
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Welcome. Gas or Auto will work on the road. Electric is only when connected to shorepower, 120V. Make sure you purge the line or air before atempting as after three attempts the gas feature shuts down if it did not light for safety. If you go outside you will hear it light or it will flash inside if not lit. Simply turn off and on again until it lights.

For the purge I light my stove top to make sure gas is in the lines.
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Old 06-15-2015, 07:36 AM   #3
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Use gas when driving; we all do that. If the frig has an auto position, set it at AUTO.
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Old 06-15-2015, 07:50 AM   #4
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We don't keep the fridge running on gas for safety reasons. (I know there are safety devices in place but it's not worth it for us should something happen in a wreck). We haven't tested it yet but have been told the fridge will stay cold once turned off for a good 6 hours. We plan on chilling it overnight before the trip and loading it with pre-chilled items and a few frozen water bottles. Things we know could spoil (like coffee creamer and milk) we'll keep in a small cooler with ice.
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Old 06-15-2015, 08:28 AM   #5
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I would say over 90% tow with gas on. Some states require it off to drive thru tunnels. Most will leave it on when fueling, but will not admit it.
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Old 06-15-2015, 08:38 AM   #6
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My very own opinion and what I practice: (I am paranoid of leaving the gas on while traveling)


1) Pre-cool the fridge and food for a full day (or more)
2) Shut off the gas and fridge just before de-leveling to hook up.
3) Allow the fridge to warm during the 4 hour ride to our campsite.
4) Level the trailer and re-start the fridge right after unhitching.


I used to leave ice packs in the freezer and move them to the fridge just before shutting down. But they made no real difference in how the food kept.
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Old 06-15-2015, 09:19 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike837go View Post
My very own opinion and what I practice: (I am paranoid of leaving the gas on while traveling) ...
Fear of a problem from the propane system running the refrigerator while traveling is just that....paranoia.

There is a far greater danger from the gasoline in the tow vehicle causing a problem than the trailer propane system. The propane system has an advantage of shutting off the flow of gas should a line become ruptured. The tow vehicle has no such safety advantage.

It's all in understanding what you have and the relative dangers of each and how they operate.

My opinion: There is a greater danger of food poisoning from getting too warm than of a problem with the propane system. And even that is almost non-existent.
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Old 06-15-2015, 09:26 AM   #8
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If you have the frig set to “Auto” it will automatically switch from 120V electric to gas. You do need to have the gas valve open on the tank, and make sure there is gas in the line. Light the stove to purge any air, if you just turned on tank.

If I recall correctly, when on electric there is a green indicator light on, if running on gas then orange, If there is a problem when running on gas the light blinks orange. All I ever look for is the light on solid or blinking. Solid on is Good, blinking is Bad.

I sometimes drive with the refrigerator on gas and sometimes not. Most of the time it depends on the distance I am traveling. If I am on the road all day, then I run on gas. If I am just going a couple of hours away, then I often do not worry about it. The key to keeping the frig cold is precooling and not opening the door.
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Old 06-15-2015, 11:15 AM   #9
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Fear of a problem from the propane system running the refrigerator while traveling is just that....paranoia.

...snip....
I'm sorry, but I started dealing with small propane systems when gas grills first hit the market in the early 1970's. Left hand threads that REQUIRED sealants. Tanks that could be filled to zero headspace. Valves that would dump full tank pressure to atmosphere.

Yes, things are much safer now: Flow limiters, OPD, right-hand ACME threads, O-rings (thank The Maker for those!), two-stage regulators, etc.

However, as 'they' say, "Old habits die hard".

In my own defense, I've been fixing engines and using power tools for over 30 years and still have 100% of my fingers and toes. So, I'll keep being paranoid when it comes to my and my loved one's safety.
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Old 06-15-2015, 06:39 PM   #10
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Thanks everyone for the advice. I pretty much follow the same procedure mike837go does. We are planning some longer trips this year when we will be driving 8 - 10 hours at a time. I was hoping to be able to use the electric as I travel. I don't like to use the propane as it has blown out in the past going down the road.

Again thanks. Stay safe and travel well.
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