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Old 08-19-2019, 11:12 PM   #1
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Inverter

Hello jayco owners,

So I have been fighting with my Rv battery. I usually un plug it when I park it but from time to time, I forget and the problem is that the battery gets drained within two days sometimes. In fact, I plugged in my trailer to my house outlet to trickle charge and the battery didnít charge much. So it makes me thing maybe thereís something wrong with the trailer inverter. I have also read in some forums that the inverter that comes stock with the trailers is not always the best ... can anyone recommend a better inverter or may have some feedback?
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Old 08-20-2019, 07:02 AM   #2
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It does sound like youíve got something draining your batteries or your batteries just arenít good anymore. I bought my Jayco this summer and found the batteries werenít any good. I couldnít get a full charge on them using a battery charger. I had a pair of 12 volts. They seemed to give better readings when I separated them from each other. I got one to charge to a little over 12 volts. When I removed the charger and let it sit for two days I checked it again to find it dropped to 6 volts. Iíve now got a pair of new batteries in my trailer. When you plug your trailer into power the inverter gives a slow charge. If you want a faster charge put your battery(ies) on a charger. Youíll find out if itís the trailer or batteries that are the problem. This is a good, and easy, first step.
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Old 08-20-2019, 07:22 AM   #3
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You are actually talking about a converter/charger not inverter. An inverter will allow 120v devices to run off 12v power source like the batteries. The converter will allow 12v devices to run off 120v shore power. The converter is also typically responsible for charging your batteries while connected to shore power.

Many people confuse the two so wanted to make sure you were on the right path to figure out your problems.
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:32 AM   #4
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As Jason said, you're talking about your converter if you're talking about charging the battery. The converters on our trailers are theoretically battery chargers/maintainers. They should charge at a high rate, not just trickle charge.

Do you have a multimeter or volt meter? What does the battery voltage read when the converter is on and the trailer is plugged in? What about after sitting with the trailer unplugged or the converter turned off for about 10 minutes? You should see over 13 volts when the converter is on and the trailer is plugged in. If the battery is charged, it should still be over 12.6 volts with no load when the trailer is unplugged.

If you don't have a multimeter you can use the battery gauge on your trailer to get an idea of what's going on. When you're trailer is plugged in and the breaker for the converter switched on, does the battery monitor show full? What about when the trailer is unplugged or the converter is switched off?

My guess is that your battery is actually the problem, but it could be the converter. How old is the battery? You said that it has been completely drained a few times. I've killed a few batteries that way.

Finally, if you discover it is the converter, I recommend the Progressive Dynamics converters.
https://www.progressivedyn.com/rv/po...r-4600-series/
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:44 AM   #5
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Keep in mind, RVs these days have several items which are direct linked to the battery's (12 volt system) and are a constant parasitic draw. The CO/Propane detector, the background internal clock and memory on the stereo/entertainment unit, etc. These constantly draw power and will kill a battery if left unchecked.
Then whether it is a high quality deep cycle RV/Marine battery, or a standard cheap deep cycle or even a car battery. Once they have been drained just one time, they will never hold the charge like they were intended to. They only get worse each time they are drained. You can ruin a good battery in a very short time by letting it die.

If you are not going plug your trailer in to shore power or connect a solar panel, or whatever you would do to maintain a charge to your battery while your RV is in storage, then you need to disconnect the battery.
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Old 08-20-2019, 04:05 PM   #6
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If you have a WFCO charger/converter, as many Jaycos have, they are junk and not your battery's friend. I have never heard anyone say that they charge like the manual says they are supposed to.
Check with Best Converter for replacement converters. They have Boondocker and Progressive Dynamics. Check them out.

http://www.bestconverter.com/
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Old 08-20-2019, 04:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVGun40 View Post
Keep in mind, RVs these days have several items which are direct linked to the battery's (12 volt system) and are a constant parasitic draw. The CO/Propane detector, the background internal clock and memory on the stereo/entertainment unit, etc. These constantly draw power and will kill a battery if left unchecked.
Then whether it is a high quality deep cycle RV/Marine battery, or a standard cheap deep cycle or even a car battery. Once they have been drained just one time, they will never hold the charge like they were intended to. They only get worse each time they are drained. You can ruin a good battery in a very short time by letting it die.

If you are not going plug your trailer in to shore power or connect a solar panel, or whatever you would do to maintain a charge to your battery while your RV is in storage, then you need to disconnect the battery.
With his battery going dead in two days Iím betting itís the batteries over parasitic draw. I can leave my batteries for two weeks and have parasitic draw not have much effect on the batteries in that short of time. I have had bad batteries go dead over a two days with nothing hooked up to them.
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Old 08-20-2019, 04:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acano82 View Post
Hello jayco owners,

So I have been fighting with my Rv battery. I usually un plug it when I park it but from time to time, I forget and the problem is that the battery gets drained within two days sometimes. Yes, this is very common. Even with everything shutoff, there are drains from the propane/CO detector and the radio. Often on this site, we've called them 'parasitic' drains.

In fact, I plugged in my trailer to my house outlet to trickle charge and the battery didnít charge much. How did you measure that? Did you happen to turn off the main circuit breaker or the breaker to your converter/charger? Either of those will prevent the converter/charger from charging your battery.

So it makes me thing maybe thereís something wrong with the trailer inverter. I have also read in some forums that the inverter that comes stock with the trailers is not always the best The usual, OEM converter/charger is a WFCO brand. They are well known for not going into 'bulk mode' for battery charging and therefor taking a longer time to fully charge a battery. But, they will fully charge a battery if given enough time. My WFCO fully charges my two, 12v batteries in 24 to 36 hours. On the plus side, it has NEVER overcharged my battery.

... can anyone recommend a better inverter or may have some feedback?
My comments in bold.
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Old 08-20-2019, 04:50 PM   #9
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Jayco-inverter-

Thank you all the the tips.. correction. You guys are right itís the converter that Iíve been suspecting maybe May not be the best... I have heard this about the converter. Iíve changed the battery twice in the last year cause theyíve gone bad from being drained.. as I mentioned before, this most recent time, I came back from a trip, and forgot it was plugged in for the weekend.. I checked the battery and it was low.. I plugged the trailer into the house and left it to trickle charge for about four days... then I go and check and the battery was still low.. so I do think Iím going to need a new battery at least but Iím going to look into the converter.
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Old 08-21-2019, 09:28 AM   #10
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Thanks for the update. Keep us posted on what you find.

You might also think about installing a low-voltage disconnect while you're in there. If it saves you once, it would pay for itself...unless you're getting free replacement batteries.

Blue Sea Systems m-LVD Low Voltage Disconnect
by Amazon.com
Learn more: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00GZOP5..._7fwxDbDDEVGH4
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Old 08-21-2019, 11:35 AM   #11
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battery disconnects are the way to go. I charge my batteries with a NOCO battery charger https://no.co/g3500 whenever i have access to shore power. Disconnect the batteries from the TT and plug it into the NOCO and have had no problems to date
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:38 PM   #12
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I prefer to use Xantrex Inverter/Chargers. It is a 3 phase full blown charger when shore power is plugged in. When shore power removed, it instantly reverts to inverter mode. Back and forth with no user input. These Xantrex units have 15 amp breaker built in so that they can be run straight to something like the outlets which can then be removed from the main breaker box. Eliminates the need for the converter and does a quicker and better job of charging up batts than the converter. AC outlets are live all the time, at least when the Xantrex is turned on.
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:21 PM   #13
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Batteries

As many have said, your inverter will let you watch your LED TV 120 volt, your coffee pot cook, etc. has nothing to do with charging your batteries. BUT you may want to check out putting 6 volt batteries in line, we did after our batteries did the same thing. We also put two solar panels on the roof which charge the batteries and we hardly ever plug in, unless weíre getting ready to go on vacation and want to be sure the batteries are fully charged. Even with the batteries on the inverter being used all day as we drive with the grandkids playing video games, watching movies etc. the solar panel always, even when cloudy out keeps our batteries on full. We have two 125 panels, which is plenty of juice for the batteries. We also changed out all the lights to LED they make a Hugh differences as to the power consumption. If your unit didnít come with them, itís well worth changing them out. You will be surprised how much longer your batteries will last. Good luck.
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:24 PM   #14
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That is unless one has a inverter/charger. Then the device serves both functions and does auto switching. Something the manufacturers should use or at least have as an option.
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:26 PM   #15
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Inverter/converter

True, but not too many people have those.
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:47 PM   #16
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When installing a inverter/charger do you remove the converter/charger and replace it with the inverter/charger or just add the inverter/charger also?
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Old 09-07-2019, 12:53 PM   #17
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Quote:
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When installing a inverter/charger do you remove the converter/charger and replace it with the inverter/charger or just add the inverter/charger also?
Whenever i have done it, I just disconnect the converter from the AC panel and let it sit since DC from the batts usually runs thru it to the DC panel. I usually set up an inverter/charger to do the AC outlets in a RV or commercial truck application, but it doesn't have to be limited to only that. In that case, I also remove the AC outlets from the AC panel breaker. I then replace the breaker for them with a 30 amp breaker that the input side of the inverter/charger is connected to. Then hook up the AC out of the inverter/charger to the outlets. A little time consuming but not rocket science.

When not hooked up to shore power, it acts as an inverter for the outlets. When shore power connected, the inverter/charger auto switches to charger for the batts and also passes thru the AC back to the outlets. The outlets remain hot all the time, shore power or not.

P.S. the inverter/charger has its own 15 amp breaker internally to protect the AC outlets.
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Old 09-09-2019, 02:04 PM   #18
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Have you checked the converter fuses

All the other replies have valid points, but I think your problem may be the converter has blown fuses. I figured this out on my own used MH when on our 1st trip the battery voltage dropped low. I have since found this on SIL TT and a cousins TT. There are two 30 or 40 amp fuses to check on the converter itself and they do occasionally get fried from overload such as putting out slides with another simultaneous heavy draw.
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:12 PM   #19
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Whenever i have done it, I just disconnect the converter from the AC panel and let it sit since DC from the batts usually runs thru it to the DC panel. I usually set up an inverter/charger to do the AC outlets in a RV or commercial truck application, but it doesn't have to be limited to only that. In that case, I also remove the AC outlets from the AC panel breaker. I then replace the breaker for them with a 30 amp breaker that the input side of the inverter/charger is connected to. Then hook up the AC out of the inverter/charger to the outlets. A little time consuming but not rocket science.

When not hooked up to shore power, it acts as an inverter for the outlets. When shore power connected, the inverter/charger auto switches to charger for the batts and also passes thru the AC back to the outlets. The outlets remain hot all the time, shore power or not.

P.S. the inverter/charger has its own 15 amp breaker internally to protect the AC outlets.


Thanks. It would be time consuming to do that in order to put it close to the battery and then run to the panel in the back end of the trailer and have it look and work good.
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