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Old 04-03-2015, 01:14 PM   #1
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Is it a good idea to lower stab jack and put pressure?

I have heard that while in long term storage, the tire, since it always stay in one spot can deteriorate on just that one low spot where it touch the ground.

Is it a good idea then to just lower all stabilizer jack and put a little bit pressure on the jacks (raising it a bit more) , therefore the weight pressure on the trailer is not exerted on the tire ?
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Old 04-03-2015, 01:27 PM   #2
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No.

Stabilizer's are just that... Stabilizers.... They are not levelers, they are not jack stands.. IF you try and put too much weight on them you will bend them... Unless you have your tires completely off of the ground your really not going to accomplish much.. If you are concerned about your tires being on the ground, then I would recommend using a bottle jack under the frame near the axles (DO NOT LIFT FROM THE AXEL) you can crush them...
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Old 04-03-2015, 06:16 PM   #3
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I agree with Tex. I've heard for years that parking a trailer with tires on gravel or boards to keep them from sitting in standing water and covering the tires to protect them from UV in the sunlight was good practice.
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Old 04-03-2015, 07:51 PM   #4
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I cut two long narrow sheets of plywood, then used spike nails and into the ground in my storage spot. Keeps the wheels up off the ground and also servers as a nice " target or runway" when backing in
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Old 04-03-2015, 07:52 PM   #5
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3-5 years from production date on ST tires is lifespan of tires. They might still look ok but they would not meet specifications after that time. Its the nature of vulcanized rubber. Put a rubber band in a drawer out of the sun for 3 to 5 years, pull it out and stretch it, it breaks. Sitting on the ground should not effect the tire.
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldermike View Post
3-5 years from production date on ST tires is lifespan of tires. They might still look ok but they would not meet specifications after that time. Its the nature of vulcanized rubber. Put a rubber band in a drawer out of the sun for 3 to 5 years, pull it out and stretch it, it breaks. Sitting on the ground should not effect the tire.
That seems kind of short but I know trailer tires are different than any other tire. Car and motorcycle tires have a life of 7 years.
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:16 PM   #7
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From Trailer life Magazine

Tire Lifespan

It seems counterintuitive, but trailer tires that are regularly used can have a better lifespan than those that are kept in storage. During use, tires release compound lubricants that can help extend tire life. A tire that is not in use can degrade from ultraviolet (UV) exposure.

The life expectancy of a trailer tire varies from manufacturer to manufacturer; however, most are between 3 to 8 years, regardless of mileage. Carlisle Tire estimates that one-third of a tire’s strength is gone in approximately 3 years. Carlisle says to consider replacement after 3 years, regardless of tread depth remaining; and at 5 years definitely replace. That’s just one company’s recommendation.

Other tire manufacturers generally suggest a tire be replaced at 7- or 8-year intervals. Frequent and detailed inspection can help you gain perspective on the tire’s ongoing condition as its projected lifespan nears its end.
- See more at: Rolling Along Safely: A Tire Guide
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:37 PM   #8
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Michelin's stance on the tire is subject is a MAXIMUM of 10 years. Tires should be inflated to max sidewall pressure and they should be put on plastic, plywood, or cardboard. Not necessary to take the weight off of them.

http://www.michelinrvtires.com/asset...ireArticle.pdf

Their video on tire blowouts is a must see for an RV driver.

http://www.michelinrvtires.com/refer...erials/videos/
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:54 PM   #9
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I think there is also a good argument for not leaving the stabilizers down at all when in long term storage. It gives rodents four more ways to enter your TT and do damage.
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Old 04-06-2015, 07:54 AM   #10
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You have to consider the load on these tires. If you do the math there is very little margin on your tires load range considering the weight of your camper.
On day one your have a tire that meets specifications and from there it's a derating curve deal.

For me, I look at OEM tires as loaner tires designed to get the camper to the dealer. Once I upgrade at least one load range I am ready for 3 years of use.

I don't look at any other type tires with this method because they are not loaded to max or even over max in many cases with RV's.

If I could make one change in the RV industry it would be to increase the safety margin in OEM axles and tires. But it's not going to happen because the average buyer looks at the interior but never looks at the tires. If we all go to the shows and read the yellow stickers and ask why the tires and axles are so close to max rating on a dry camper this might change, who knows.
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