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Old 11-25-2023, 11:22 AM   #1
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Keeping batteries charged during off season

2017 Jayco 195RB
Would like to keep batteries charged during off season (about 5 months) by plugging my 30 amp to an outlet (20 amp breaker) in shop (trailer will be outdoors) the reason is we may have company staying in side once in a while. I would like to plug into a heavy duty timer. One question is is it ok to plug my 30 amp from trailer to an outlet protected by a 20 amp breaker, I realize I can't use any high power items such as air cond or microwave, my only concern is just keeping the batteries charged>
Thanks
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Old 11-25-2023, 11:27 AM   #2
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A lot of RV'rs do just that including myself. I wouldn't worry with a timer of any sorts though. ~CA
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Old 11-25-2023, 03:13 PM   #3
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110 volt

Do you know if the 110v 20 amp charges the battery also?
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Old 11-25-2023, 03:15 PM   #4
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As mentioned this should be no problem. If you use a heavy enough duty extension cord of minimum length, you could probably use your microwave and everything else. The AC may not work but then again you probably wouldn't need to use it during winter.
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Old 11-25-2023, 04:04 PM   #5
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Don't forget to check the battery water level before charging it all winter and check at least once every month or two if possible. You might consider a battery tender and turn off the RV one. Would use a little less electricity, less wear on the built in charge system and possibly be better for the battery as a battery tender may be more accurate in amount of charge to keep them topped off.
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Old 11-27-2023, 09:29 PM   #6
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Just my opinion, which means nothing. I would much rather have a $200 converter charger connected to and charging my batteries, than a $20-$40 battery tender or charger. The converter will do an excellent job of keeping them charged. Once charged, mine shows zero amps and stays at 13.1 volts.
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Old 11-28-2023, 06:06 AM   #7
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2017 Jayco 195RB
Would like to keep batteries charged during off season (about 5 months) by plugging my 30 amp to an outlet (20 amp breaker) in shop (trailer will be outdoors) the reason is we may have company staying in side once in a while. I would like to plug into a heavy duty timer. One question is is it ok to plug my 30 amp from trailer to an outlet protected by a 20 amp breaker, I realize I can't use any high power items such as air cond or microwave, my only concern is just keeping the batteries charged>
Thanks
No need for a timer. Just use an adapter to plug into house.

I have a 50 amp trailer. For the past 3 weeks I've used a 50amp>30amp>15amp adapter connected to a good extension cord. Using the trailer's cord this purpose is a pain b/c there's so much of it and it is so heavy. I keep the connections under the trailer and covered them with a plastic bin for protection.

I ordered and just received (yesterday) an adapter that plugs directly into my trailer's 50 amp receptacle and the other end has a typical 15amp male to receive the extension from the house. You can buy these in 30amp models, too.

I've included a photo of the 50amp version and the 30 amp version. NOTE: there are 2 version of 30amp...typical prongs or the twist lock type. Pay attention to what type of connection you have on your trailer.

It was so nice to be able to roll up that giant cord and put it away.
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Old 11-28-2023, 06:49 PM   #8
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2017 Jayco 195RB
Would like to keep batteries charged during off season (about 5 months) by plugging my 30 amp to an outlet (20 amp breaker) in shop (trailer will be outdoors) the reason is we may have company staying in side once in a while. I would like to plug into a heavy duty timer. One question is is it ok to plug my 30 amp from trailer to an outlet protected by a 20 amp breaker, I realize I can't use any high power items such as air cond or microwave, my only concern is just keeping the batteries charged>
Thanks
We leave our trailer plugged into a 20amp outlet in our garage all summer. We run the A/C off it and everything else. Never had it trip yet. And that's where you would have an issue if any, would be the panel in the house
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Old 11-28-2023, 07:09 PM   #9
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Do you know if the 110v 20 amp charges the battery also?
If this question is "will it charge the chassis battery also?", the answer is no. But as mentioned elsewhere on this site, you can use a tender to keep the chassis battery charged. Just use one of your coach's 110v outlets to plug in the tender. Between your converter and the tender, you will place a relatively small load on you 20a power supply.
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Old 11-28-2023, 07:41 PM   #10
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Do you know if the 110v 20 amp charges the battery also?

It looks like you have a travel trailer. So the "battery" you're referring to is the one on the trailer?
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Old 11-29-2023, 07:13 PM   #11
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converter

Do you think the stock converter is a capable unit to do a good job of maintaining my batteries for the winter as opposed to the noco 10?
2017 jayco 195RB.. Don't know anything about my converter.
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Old 11-29-2023, 10:17 PM   #12
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Do you think the stock converter is a capable unit to do a good job of maintaining my batteries for the winter as opposed to the noco 10?
2017 jayco 195RB.. Don't know anything about my converter.
Well you could pop the cover open on the converter and look up the make and model. But just glancing over the Jayco Brochure for your 22017 195RB, looks like you've got a common 30A trailer.

Which means, most likely, yeah - the stock converter will do an excellent job of maintaining your batteries all winter. Just like it does the other months of the year.

If you've got 120V AC where you store your trailer, then yeah - plug your trailer in, leave the master switch on and let the converter take care of your battery.
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Old 12-02-2023, 01:03 PM   #13
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I put up a similar post not too long ago.

I have a Class C. Been plugging into an outside outlet at our house that is 15A rated. Shut off some of the breakers in the RV for things like Microwave, Fridge and AC just to be safe. That charges the house battery.

And noticed the chassis battery going down, so got a charger/maintainer for that, which plugs into the RV A/C outlet. Seems to be working fine.
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Old 12-02-2023, 08:41 PM   #14
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Keeping batteries charged off season

The converter chargers built into most RVís expensive units because of the convertors the chargers are cheap basic automatic battery chargers . They are not Smart chargers or 3 stage chargers that stop charging the battery when it is fully charged.Than go into float mode monitor it become like a trickle charger. Automatic battery chargers do not work this way they shut off after it is fully charged and if left plugged in after a time will start charging again then shut off again which after a month or so can be damaging which will shorten battery life.If you have separate SMART charger that will be best way to keep your battery up all winter even in cold weather. Otherwise you could plug in a separate trickle chargers on your batteries all winter as long as the battery is fully charged beforehand .Trickle chargers will not charge a low battery.
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Old 12-02-2023, 09:36 PM   #15
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converter is dead

Just as I decided I would use my converter to keep my batteries charge I found out my converter is shot, ordered a WFCO WF-8735-AD, Jayco does one messy job wiring these things.
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Old 12-02-2023, 10:43 PM   #16
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Rv converters are necessary not very energy efficient.I have not had any trouble with them in RV’s I have owned yeah wiring to them is a nightmare sometimes wire terminals get loose then ark and corrode
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Old 12-03-2023, 09:36 AM   #17
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I agree with Leon that converters are inefficient and expensive. Until I switched to Renogy lithium I used a Battery Tender Junior. Now I still use if for my garden tractor battery. I did try a Harbor Freight tender but it's chip was bad and voltages were off so took it back.

With my 3 month gaurantee tractor battery going on 3 years of use I think it is better than the built in converter would be to accurately add the charge needed.

PS, the 12 volt ground bar on my converter never had the screws to hold the wires down tightened. And it is a mess back there.
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Old 12-03-2023, 11:34 AM   #18
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While I disagree with Leon and Roger regarding the efficiency of an RV power converter, I do so with respect.

Almost all RV converters available today (and for ~20 years or more) are listed as >85% efficiency (often +- 5%) which is similar for example to a brand new NOCO "energy efficient" charger\maintainer at 86% (I couldn't find a reference for Battery Tender brand). You can find a variance between manufactures of a few percent however be aware that some converters and chargers are listed as "Peak" efficiency (vs minimum efficiency) which peak efficiency is often in the low 90's.

Also to note, back before the year 2000 many RV converters were "Dumb" and perhaps a better term would be that they were simply power supplies with a fixed output voltage. Since that time almost every RV power converter sold and installed in new RV's became "smart" commonly with 3 stage charging and some with 4 stage charging and often with different charge profiles for different battery(s), however LifePo4 weren't very common even 5~10 years ago as they are today which is why many converters didn't and still don't have a LifePo4 setting although here in 2023 it is not hard to find converters with a LifePo4 charge profile setting that can be purchased as an upgrade \ replacement or even already installed in the newer RV's.

In any case, my point for sharing is to point out that using a small (trickle, maintainer, or similar name) charger to maintain the RV's battery over the winter isn't going to save you on your electric bill vs using the RV's converter (except for perhaps the 20+ years old dumb converters which are not really optimal for maintaining a battery regardless of its efficiency rating).

There are reasons for using trickle\maintainer style chargers though, and I also use them as well, but my usage is for the batteries other than those that can be maintained by my RV's converter. ~CA
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