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Old 07-06-2016, 02:22 PM   #21
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Funny!
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:42 PM   #22
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Thyamine,

As you can see from this pic, I too own a White Hawk, of similar length, and with a driveway that's probably a little more sloped than yours. One thing to add to all the good advice you've already received is to consider taking extra precautions due to your trailer's wide stance axles. If you bring the trailer to level using your tongue jack stand, you'll be putting an inordinate amount of load on just the back axle. If you can bring both axles close to level, the load will be more evenly distributed, which I think is important for the axles and tires, particularly if you're going to store the rig on an incline for an extended period.



I brought both axles very close to level by using one Andersen leveler on each of the front wheels. I then added x-chocks (not seen here) to further stabilize the trailer, which also had traditional wheel chocks on both sides of the rear axle. The Andersens gave my front axle 4" of lift, which was almost exactly what I needed to bring the axles level.

Up front, to elevate the tongue jack and provide a higher landing surface for the front stabilizers, I used standard 8"x8"x16" concrete cinder blocks paired with 2"x6" lumber to distribute the load over the blocks and to protect my driveway. One poster commented that cinder blocks can be problematic, and he's right - if not used properly they can break. However, if you place the blocks with the hollow cores in the vertical, not horizontal position, you'd be hard pressed to find anything stronger for this application. A standard cinder block (ASTM C90) has a net compressive strength of 1,900 psi. There's no way a White Hawk is going to break those blocks. Place them with the hollow cores in the horizontal, however, and they likely will break.

Anyway, my driveway is too steep for me to routinely store the trailer there. I brought it to level at home just one time, to do some mods, check out all systems and load it with the typical camping accessories that stay on board full time. I store it remotely now and when we go camping I pick it up on the way home from work, swing by to grab my family and we head out. Wish I could keep it at home but my driveway makes it too inconvenient. Hope this helps.
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:44 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by TWP723 View Post
First of all, never park your TT upside down. I've done this before after a night of drinking and it puts wear-n-tear on your roof. Second, always chock before unhitching.. front and rear of wheels. What you built for the tongue looks pretty darn good if I say so myself. It scares me (even with proper chocking) to park for extended periods of time on a steep decline/incline. But I understand some folk have no choice. And just fyi, there's no such thing as "too much chocking". However, there is such thing as "too much upside down'.
I unfortunately have no karma/points to give out, but I would mod you up if I could. lol
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:46 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by TWP723 View Post
First of all, never park your TT upside down. I've done this before after a night of drinking and it puts wear-n-tear on your roof. Second, always chock before unhitching.. front and rear of wheels. What you built for the tongue looks pretty darn good if I say so myself. It scares me (even with proper chocking) to park for extended periods of time on a steep decline/incline. But I understand some folk have no choice. And just fyi, there's no such thing as "too much chocking". However, there is such thing as "too much upside down'.
Love it!
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:59 PM   #25
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Old 07-06-2016, 03:18 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by TWP723 View Post
First of all, never park your TT upside down. I've done this before after a night of drinking and it puts wear-n-tear on your roof. Second, always chock before unhitching.. front and rear of wheels. What you built for the tongue looks pretty darn good if I say so myself. It scares me (even with proper chocking) to park for extended periods of time on a steep decline/incline. But I understand some folk have no choice. And just fyi, there's no such thing as "too much chocking". However, there is such thing as "too much upside down'.
So far I've been able to avoid that upside down thing, thank goodness!

HAHAHAHAHAHA!
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Old 07-06-2016, 03:19 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TWP723 View Post
First of all, never park your TT upside down. I've done this before after a night of drinking and it puts wear-n-tear on your roof. Second, always chock before unhitching.. front and rear of wheels. What you built for the tongue looks pretty darn good if I say so myself. It scares me (even with proper chocking) to park for extended periods of time on a steep decline/incline. But I understand some folk have no choice. And just fyi, there's no such thing as "too much chocking". However, there is such thing as "too much upside down'.
I couldn't find this info anywhere in my owners manual but did find a funny looking label with the writing upside down that I couldn't quite read...
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Old 07-06-2016, 03:45 PM   #28
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I prefer the hard rubber chocks (made from recycled tires I think) as they tend to slide a lot less on asphalt but are probably 5 times the weight of the plastic chocks. One more tip if you are parking on asphalt, putting the wheels on some 5ft 2X8's to prevent the wheels from putting tire divots in the asphalt on hot days. I found this out from my previous TT which had dual axles and weighed 3000 lbs dry so I have made sure the Eagle is up on boards in the driveway. Finally, the X-chocks are also great for stability and one extra level of security to keep your TT in place.
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