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Old 06-19-2011, 08:19 AM   #11
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I don't understand what "the way they told you to store it" means. Was it extremely cold or closed up?

It's hard to form an opinion based on the info provided. Replacing vinyl is not the end of the world.
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Old 06-19-2011, 09:11 AM   #12
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Whenever something like this happens to us, we look at it as an opportunity to upgrade and add our own personal touch to our home away from home. There are so many flooring options now, your choices are virtually limitless (Laminate, wood, vinyl, carpet, etc.) You can even customize it with a combination of the materials of your choosing. Oh and don't be too harsh on Jayco; there aren't many manufacturers that will provide a lifetime guarantee or ever one beyond 1 or 2 years. Profit margins just don't allow for such guarantees to exist in such a competitive market.
Good luck with the reno.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:38 AM   #13
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Whenever something like this happens to us, we look at it as an opportunity to upgrade and add our own personal touch to our home away from home. There are so many flooring options now, your choices are virtually limitless (Laminate, wood, vinyl, carpet, etc.) You can even customize it with a combination of the materials of your choosing. Oh and don't be too harsh on Jayco; there aren't many manufacturers that will provide a lifetime guarantee or ever one beyond 1 or 2 years. Profit margins just don't allow for such guarantees to exist in such a competitive market.
Good luck with the reno.
I agree. The OP can take this opportunity to make it better. Much better then "average" factory. My BIL bought a used camper and he didn't like its softc floor and its and "ugly" floor pattern. He simply glued/screwed new plywood down and added much better flooring. Before and after is awesome. And, its floor is much tfirmer as well. Extra weight? No really. The benefits of much better (stronger and better pattern) floor was worth it. If into DIY tasks (with your own hands), then "go for it". Like an artist. The canvas is now blank. Turn the new output into almost anything you want. And, think outside the circle as well. Works for me....
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Old 06-19-2011, 12:20 PM   #14
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...Extra weight? No really. The benefits of much better (stronger and better pattern) floor was worth it...
A sheet of 5/8" 4' x 8' plywood weighs roughly 65-70 lb. That weight adds up in a hurry. Granted, it will make for a much more solid floor but the extra weight could be enough to kill any usable load capacity. There would also be potential problems with transitions, door clearances, etc. due to the thickness. If all the OP needs is an overlayment to smooth out the floor, something much thinner, such as door skins, would be far more practical. If the floor is squishy in places, it probably needs replacing, not covering.

If I had that job staring me in the face (thank God I don't!), I would use a knife or a multitool to cut the vinyl along walls and cabinets, then use a multitool with a scraper to remove the vinyl. Minor dings in the floor would be repaired with automotive Bondo (bonds very well, sets fast and hard with minimal shrinkage and is easily cut flush to the floor as long as one doesn't wait until it gets too hard to do so easily). I would then lay a floating vinyl floor, probably Allure because it would be much easier to fit than sheet goods. Laminate is more durable but also can be pretty heavy, although not nearly as much as 5/8" ply as long as the thinner grades are used.
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Old 06-19-2011, 12:44 PM   #15
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Sorry you feel that adding more plywood to the existing TT floor will add "too much" weight. If you look on You-Tube, you'll see many people adding plywood 1/2" - 5/8" to their existing floors. Especially after their floors root out. If my TT's floor was weak and it needed to be made stronger, I will add more plywood on existing. Remember that many TT's have 500 to 2,000 lbs of "unloaded" cargo capacity (depending on size and make of TT). A few sheets of 30 lbs of plywood isn't going to blow it off the weight scale. If it does, then that specific TT has other serious problems.

There's some folks who are arm chair experts but never been there themselves. Unknown to some, I've actually stripped my 2006 Jayco flooring down - from bottom up. Ripped out that usless plastic layer, ripped out that useless soft material and ripped out that useless fibreglass batts. I know what's under the Jayco floor. And, I know much more then a Jayco factory video will show you. Especially when it comes to "pulled to tight" brake wiring, dangling wires, useless fabric heat vents, etc. etc. They use 5/8" single sheet plywood and where needed, they shave down the high spots with a power grinder. Thus, leaving the floor boards 1/2" thick in spots. They also use 2x2s and drill holes for water pipes. Thus, coverting the board down to 2x1s. For 2x2 supports, they also use steel rails 24" apart. That doesn't even come close to "minimum code" for a stick home construction. And people wonder why their Jayco floor has a "mush" feeling when walked on. Yet, Jayco Factory Tour videos make their TT sound super strong.

If one wants to get rid of the "mush", they add "proper" thick plywood ontop of it. Or, they re-inforce the underside floor - which is near impossible because of tanks, LP lines, wiring and air ducts. Add a floating floor on existing "shaved down" 5/8" mush feeling sheeting if you want. But if the under floor is "mush" (like many of their TTs/5ers), the floating floor will feel mush as well. And, it too will crack and split in time. If one wants to do it right (even for a home's kitchen floor), they firm-up the main surface first. Then, they add their cosmetic material on it....

To view underside of Jayco TT floors, surf:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2054.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2055.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2048.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0607.jpg

Lucky, I've been there (with my own hands) myself in the past... Putting "mush on much = mush" in the long run. If the floor has a mush feeling, firm it up first - before adding new costmetic surface (like a floating floor material). It really is that simple...
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:50 PM   #16
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Any repair is a chance to make it better than original. I don't know of very much on a trailer that I would not or could not have done better. An extra $100 for a better material means a lot to a manufaturer who is trying to keep unit cost down. it doesn't mean as much to me if I'm going to be living in it.
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Old 06-19-2011, 02:06 PM   #17
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I'm keeping a close eye on this thread. If wondering, my 29 FBS has a soft spot on its floor at its kitchen sink area. Exactly were a person stands to do dishes. Budgeted for next year, I plan to remove its vinyl, then glue/screw 5/8 plywood on it (ontop of its "shaved down" 5/8" plywood), then install new vinyl. Our 29 FT tt has a master bedroom in the front 1/3, had kids bedrooms within its rear 1/3 area. Thus, I only need to add new wood flooring and new vinyl within its middle 1/3 area. And, install a vinal edge (in the hallway area). Thus, only a few lbs of extra weight. And since we don't transport fresh water, this added weight of "stronger floor" is nothing (compared to a full tank of fresh water). Even though our TT has a slide, I'd be removing its main chassis rug (where it goes under the slide). Thus, lots of room for additonal 5/8" plywood + vinyl thickness. And as Bob mentioned, making its floor (within its main traffic area) much stronger then factory design is a good idea. Especially to eliminate soft spots.

Hopefully, our OP "cranberryfraser5" provides an update. On what he applied to his specific trailer.
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Old 06-19-2011, 03:05 PM   #18
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Sorry you feel that adding more plywood to the existing TT floor will add "too much" weight. If you look on You-Tube, you'll see many people adding plywood 1/2" - 5/8" to their existing floors. Especially after their floors root out. If my TT's floor was weak and it needed to be made stronger, I will add more plywood on existing. Remember that many TT's have 500 to 2,000 lbs of "unloaded" cargo capacity (depending on size and make of TT). A few sheets of 30 lbs of plywood isn't going to blow it off the weight scale. If it does, then that specific TT has other serious problems.

There's some folks who are arm chair experts but never been there themselves. Unknown to some, I've actually stripped my 2006 Jayco flooring down - from bottom up. Ripped out that usless plastic layer, ripped out that useless soft material and ripped out that useless fibreglass batts. I know what's under the Jayco floor. And, I know much more then a Jayco factory video will show you. Especially when it comes to "pulled to tight" brake wiring, dangling wires, useless fabric heat vents, etc. etc. They use 5/8" single sheet plywood and where needed, they shave down the high spots with a power grinder. Thus, leaving the floor boards 1/2" thick in spots. They also use 2x2s and drill holes for water pipes. Thus, coverting the board down to 2x1s. For 2x2 supports, they also use steel rails 24" apart. That doesn't even come close to "minimum code" for a stick home construction. And people wonder why their Jayco floor has a "mush" feeling when walked on. Yet, Jayco Factory Tour videos make their TT sound super strong.

If one wants to get rid of the "mush", they add "proper" thick plywood ontop of it. Or, they re-inforce the underside floor - which is near impossible because of tanks, LP lines, wiring and air ducts. Add a floating floor on existing "shaved down" 5/8" mush feeling sheeting if you want. But if the under floor is "mush" (like many of their TTs/5ers), the floating floor will feel mush as well. And, it too will crack and split in time. If one wants to do it right (even for a home's kitchen floor), they firm-up the main surface first. Then, they add their cosmetic material on it....

To view underside of Jayco TT floors, surf:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2054.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2055.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_2048.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0607.jpg

Lucky, I've been there (with my own hands) myself in the past... Putting "mush on much = mush" in the long run. If the floor has a mush feeling, firm it up first - before adding new costmetic surface (like a floating floor material). It really is that simple...
Whatever.

I've seen plenty of posts/videos where people have added ply to their floors yet none have reported the amount of weight it has added to their rigs. Curious.

I'm no stranger to remodeling. I gutted a vintage travel trailer and completely rebuilt the interior. I've owned a couple of mobile homes and a stick house and did extensive remodeling/maintenance on all of them including electrical (I worked 32 years for a power and irrigation utility), plumbing, framing, cabinet work (I was also a cabinet maker for a while; I minored in industrial arts in college), heating and air, etc. and did it all well so I'm not just speaking from my armchair.

Granted, a travel trailer is nowhere near the codes for stick houses but then, stick houses don't go anywhere. If a TT was built to stick house standards, it would take a Freightliner to lug it around. A bouncy floor is a small price to pay for portability.

Not all Jaycos are built the way you have described. The floors on the Eagles on up are a laminated foam and ply sandwich which is far more rigid than just ply. Also, the plumbing is run above floor except when it penetrated the floor to go to the tanks. Little wiring goes through the floor area and any holes through structural members for wiring will cause only minimal strength reduction. I've walked (and bounced) in many Eagles and a couple of Pinnacles and the floors were pretty rigid (and I'm a big broad).
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Old 06-19-2011, 03:26 PM   #19
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I have heard of this happening where extreme cold temperatures are encountered (well below zero) to many brands. I`m not excusing it, but it does happen more often then one might think. Under the warranty period I`m thinking they would have replaced it. But not on a 4 yr old unit.
Lee,

I agree, over the course of the last five years there as been a lot of chatter about the impact of cold weather on RV vinyl flooring, IMO the biggest problem is that RV interiors are not climate controlled during the "cold" winter storage months. This is an issue with all RV manufactures, not just Jayco

I do know that Jayco a couple of years ago looked into different ways of installing the vinyl (glued, free floating, etc.) in an attempt to minimize the impact of cold weather on the vinyl flooring. If I'm not mistaken (???) Jayco doesn't glue the vinyl flooring down any more, thus allowing some freedom of movement during extreme temp changes.

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Old 06-19-2011, 03:58 PM   #20
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ok then...

I'm still trying to calculate why a few sheets of 5/8 or 3/4" plywood on existing floor in the main chassis area (not the entire flooring area) will be "too much" weight. So much weight, it forces the TT over its GVW? Please explain why making any floor "better then factory" is also a bad thing? Sorry... I don't get it.... Or should I do a "what ever" comment back as well?

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