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Old 09-26-2011, 05:51 PM   #1
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storage doors leaking

I have a 2010 Eagle 320rls. the storage doors were leaking. took to dealer and they had to order new doors. Checked the floor in storage compartment and it is toast. they are replacing the floor. anyone else had any problems with storage doors?
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:58 PM   #2
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The storage door on the bedroom silde leaks every time it rains. The dealer couldn't find the leak.
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Old 09-26-2011, 07:09 PM   #3
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The door needs to be removed, all of the old sealant removed,(there won't be much of it) and resealed with silicon.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:09 PM   #4
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The door needs to be removed, all of the old sealant removed,(there won't be much of it) and resealed with silicon.
Using silcone is not a good idea. Although it will seal for a while, there are sealants that will seal better and last longer. Once silicone has been used, nothing will ever stick there again, including more silicone, until all traces of the silicone have been removed. This may not be too basd with aluminum but on fiberglass, it usually means having to grind away a thin layer of the 'glass since it is slightly permeable and the silicone will soak in a bit.

A better sealant would be one of the marine sealants, such as 3M 4200. Any marine outlet will naturally have it but many home centers and hardware stores also carry it. Amazon.com also has it. The only downsides are it does stick tenaciously (wear gloves) and once a tube is opened, you have only 24 hours to use it before it cures in the tube.
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:42 PM   #5
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Using silcone is not a good idea. Although it will seal for a while, there are sealants that will seal better and last longer. Once silicone has been used, nothing will ever stick there again, including more silicone, until all traces of the silicone have been removed. This may not be too basd with aluminum but on fiberglass, it usually means having to grind away a thin layer of the 'glass since it is slightly permeable and the silicone will soak in a bit.

A better sealant would be one of the marine sealants, such as 3M 4200. Any marine outlet will naturally have it but many home centers and hardware stores also carry it. Amazon.com also has it. The only downsides are it does stick tenaciously (wear gloves) and once a tube is opened, you have only 24 hours to use it before it cures in the tube.
Silicon has been one of the sealants of choice in the marine industry for years, including for use on fiberglass. It does not permeate the gelcoat in any manner that requires the removal of any material to clean it off. Like any other sealant, it does require the removal of all existing material and that the surface be squeaky clean.

For many years 3M made three classes of sealants/adhesives, polyuerathane, poly-sulfide, and silicon. The polyuerathanes were very agressive adhesives, used for below waterline applications and for attaching structural pieces that were never intended to be separated for any reason. May fiberglass layup were destroyed by trying to remove components that had been bedded.sealed with the polyuerathane adhesives. Next were the polysulfides. They were great for caulking applications and had a useful life expectncy of 7-8 years and then it usually needed to be removed and reapplied. The drawback was that it was very agressive towards any type of plastic material, but worked well with fiberglass, metal, and wood. As good as the polysulfides were, unfortunately the term "sulfide" raised fears in the hearts of the environmentalist whackos and the EPA made it gradually disappear from the shelves. Last but not least on the list were the silicon sealants.They were the sealant of choice for use when installing plastic ports in fiberglass cabin tops. The port/window manufacturers specified to use silicon because the other types of sealants were too agreesive and would attack ABS plastic components. I installed/resealed dozens of ports using silicon and never experienced a situation where the old material had "attached" to the gelcoat surface necessitating the removal of any fiberglass or gelcoat material. It could always be completely removed using acetone, or even denatured alcohol. When I removed my baggage doors to reseal them, I asked the dealer what to use and was also told then to use a good exterior grade of silicon. if you look on the shelves of the RV dealers, almost all of the sealants that they sell under various trade names are silicon based and some quick looks on the manufacturers websites will verify that. The exceptions to the last statement are going to be the adhesives and sealants used for rubber roof installation and repair.
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Old 09-27-2011, 02:22 PM   #6
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The reason I recommended the 3M 4200 is it will not stick so tenaciously the object being sealed cannot be removed without damaging it or the surface it is being mounted to. It is recommended for fiberglass and gel coats. You may have been thinking of 3M 5200 which will stick so strongly it is pretty much impossible to remove without damage. Also, 3M 5200 is not UV protected. Often 3M 4200, which is UV protected, is used to protect the exposed parts of 3M 5200 applications. Both work best in bedding applications.

I've recaulked many bathtub to shower surround joints which involved at least one surface being fiberglass, ABS or acrylic and the other including grouted ceramic, enameled or porcelain covered steel or cast iron, and painted plaster or drywall and had the devil's own time getting rid of all traces of any old silicone, no matter what solvent I used, off the fiberglass. Carefully sanding the top layer off was the only thing that consistently worked the first time. Metal and glazed ceramics were the only ones silicone didn't seem to permeate

I've used various kinds of caulks instead and never had any of them attack any of the plastic surfaces I applied them to, including the polyurethanes, polysulfides, butyl, and butyl latex.

I used to build and repair frameless aquariums using clear silicone sealant (the kind without fungicide, usually marketed as being safe for aquariums or food preparation equipment). Even completely clean looking glass removed from an aquarium could still have enough silicone on the surface to cause the joint to fail. I never found a solvent that would remove all traces of silicone from glass, impermeable as it is, unless I had repeatedly scraped the surface with razor blades first. Then copious amounts of acetone, changing rags or paper towels frequently, and a lot of hard scrubbing would remove the last traces. The only reason I even bothered with silicone back then was it was the only clear sealant that would stick to glass well enough to hold an aquarium together. I haven't tried any of the new marine sealants on glass.

As far as dealer recommendations go, we have seen plenty of posts on these forums about incompetent factory authorized dealers. At one time, the silicones were the best around but, except for specialized applications, there are newer sealants that outperform the silicones without the problems of the silicones.
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