Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-12-2011, 11:52 AM   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
Rustic Eagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,371
Quote:
Originally Posted by doodlehill View Post
I have recently purchased a 330 RLTS and am towing with a 2011 F 250 Diesel. Using a round bar hitch........snip
Jeff,

Welcome to the Jayco forums.

Not sure if your "round bar" WDH is new, or from your prior TV/TT combination, but you may want to check your 330RLTS's "loaded" tongue weight just to confirm that your WDH round bar weight rating is sufficient.

Most round spring bar WDH ratings max out at 1,200lbs, and ideally you want a loaded tongue weight of 13% to 15% of the 330RLTS's loaded weight. A 1,200lb rating "might" work if one packs extremely lite, travels solo, no fluids, etc., but only a CAT scale visit can confirm.

Just food for thought.

I wish that my present TV was a good match for the 330RLTS, otherwise I would be looking very seriously at one....., very nice TT.

Bob
__________________

__________________

2016 GM 2500HD 6.0L/4.10
2018 Jay Flight 24RBS
2005 Jayco Eagle 278FBS (retired)
1999 Jayco Eagle 246FB (retired)
Reese HP Dual Cam (integrated sway control)
Rustic Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2011, 12:26 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: North Jersey
Posts: 34
My set up is a Dodge dually with the Huskey centerline hitch set up for my 330rlts and I love how she tows at highway speeds with semi`s cruising along next to me,no sway
__________________

novaplum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2011, 01:56 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: North Idaho/Arizona
Posts: 5,303
We have a Husky WD hitch and don't have a sway problem. I also have a friction sway controller but I havn't used it. We tow with a 3500 Ram srw.
__________________
2011 Eagle 330RLTS with just about every option.
2017 Silverado 1500 4x4 5.3 with tow package.

I was born with nothing and I still have most of it left.
clutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2011, 07:38 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
rodro123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 458
I have the equalizer 4 point sway. I'm glad I use the sway bar, wait till you hit 30-40 MPH side winds you will wish you had sway control. Remember your truck is under 2 tons but the tt is 5-6 tons. When the TT sways and it will your toast.
__________________
Rod & Linda From Wisconsin
1- Labs (Ronnie)
2018 Eagle 330 RSTS
2015 Chevy Silverrado 2500
14,000#/1400 Equal-i-zer 4-way sway bars
rodro123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2011, 09:48 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Seann45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Saskatoon Sask Canada
Posts: 9,701
Since I did not see anyone touch on this... Sway is caused by too little weight on the tongue of the trailer... you should have 10-15% of the trailer weight on the tongue... I am on the plus side of 15% and no problems with sway... but then I also have a Hensley Arrow... but got that for my last trailer and eventually moved it over to the J.
__________________
Seann
2004 Chev Silverado Duramax optioned past the max. 2009 Jayco Eagle 308 RLS 765 watts of solar, 6-6 volt batteries (696 amp hour), 2000 watt (4000 surge) whole house inverter.
175 days boondocking in 2017
215/2016, 211/2015, 196/14, 247/13, 193/12

Seann45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2011, 10:22 AM   #16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 13
the 330 RTLS should be very heavy upfront with the bedroom slide, so that should help with sway control a lot.
pcx8000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2011, 11:19 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: AZ, USA, Earth
Posts: 1,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seann45 View Post
Since I did not see anyone touch on this... Sway is caused by too little weight on the tongue of the trailer... you should have 10-15% of the trailer weight on the tongue... I am on the plus side of 15% and no problems with sway... but then I also have a Hensley Arrow... but got that for my last trailer and eventually moved it over to the J.
Too little tongue weight is one cause. Not enough weight on the front of the tow vehicle is another, possibly the biggest, reason. The main purpose of weight distribution hitches is to transfer weight from behind the tow vehicle's axle to the front wheels.

When one hitches a trailer to a point behind the tow vehicles rear axle, the entire tow vehicle behaves like a lever with the rear axle becoming the fulcrum of the lever. The trailer tongue presses down on the hitch, causing the front end to be levered up. Without enough weight on the front tires, they do not have enough traction to keep the tow vehicle pointed where it is supposed to go, creating a tail wagging the dog situation).

Fifth wheel trailers and semis avoid this problem by cantilevering the hitchpoint of the trailer over the back of the tow vehicle so the weight is applied a little ways in front of the rear axle (or the virtual centerpoint of dual rear axles). This ensures enough of the weight of the "tongue" is transferred to the front wheels to ensure they can have enough weight to keep the two connected vehicles pointed in the proper direction.

Something different is needed for conventional trailers such as travel trailers. Past solutions have included contraptions such as tow dollys that took most of the tongue weight off the tow vehicle (those were heavy, expensive, and didn't work all that well), hitches that used spring bars to transfer weight to the rear axle (also heavy, expensive, were murder on the axles--most tow vehicle warranties are now voided by them--and usually required relocating the spare tire), and hitches mounted under the tow vehicle (one is still being sold) that moved the pivot point of the tongue to the tow vehicle frame at a point closer to the rear axle (though they do work very well, they limit turning radius, are very expensive and heavy, and require relocating the spare tire).

The most successful and practical solution for conventional trailers is something that will transfer some of the tongue weight forward to the front wheels. This is most commonly done with a weight distribution hitch. It works by making the hitch work as though the connection between the trailer and tow vehicle is a rigid connection so the lever action on the tow vehicle can't occur. A rigid connection would work great as long as the combination was on level ground and no turns were needed. Unfortunately, at some point the combination needs to turn and there will be grade changes that will require the connection to pivot up and down and sideways. The solution, the weight distribution hitch, uses spring bars mounted to the trailer to allow up and down pivoting at the hitch while limiting some of that pivoting to reduce the amount of leverage occurring.

To reduce the amount of side to side pivoting that can allow sway to occurr, some hitches use friction devices. Usually separate devices, they stiffen the connection between the trailer and and tow vehicle to reduce the trailer's ability to behave like the tail end of a happy tuna. Others will incorportate the friction in the spring bars or add a cam action that increases spring tension as the hitch pivots from side to side, creating a resistance to turning. Both seem to work well and also allow backing without having to disconnect anything.

One hitch that combines several principles for reducing sway without the disadvantages of the others is the Hensley-Arrow. The manufacturer claims it moves the virtual hitch pivot point forward but there has been considerable debate on the validity of that claim. What isn't debatable is the darned thing actually does work very well and is less work to hitch up since there are fewer heavy components to lug around. The three main disadvantages are expense, a more difficult initial installation (both of which are only a first time problem), and weight (which may outweight the advantages).
__________________
Jeannie
Lady Fitzgerald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2011, 08:52 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: North Idaho/Arizona
Posts: 5,303
Hitch weight on a 330RLTS is around 1500#. On an 11000# loaded trailer the tongue is plenty heavy. In the wind I really don't see any difference towing this from our old Montana 5er.
__________________

__________________
2011 Eagle 330RLTS with just about every option.
2017 Silverado 1500 4x4 5.3 with tow package.

I was born with nothing and I still have most of it left.
clutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.