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Old 04-15-2020, 12:53 PM   #21
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I have a jeep grand cherokee. I can tow 6500. The trailer I have now says minimum 2900. But the GWVR is 3500. A friend of mine did the math and told me I have about 70% tow capacity. Go figure. Did great, took our time up wolf pass in Colorado. Elevation about 10000 but it did great. Trucks I heard have a better gvwr. Good luck
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:00 PM   #22
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I have a 2013 F150 FX4, with Tow Package, rated like you at 11,500. Had a JayCo JayFlight 32BHDS that weighed 7600 lbs dry according to the sticker/rating. I towed it fine up into the NC mountains, and down to the coast - wherever we wanted to go with no issues. And, the main thing - was able to stop it, whenever I needed to. Towed with the wife, 2 adolescent kids, and the dog. We would be fully loaded, except water, which usually included food, drinks, clothing, etc. I never put it on the scales - had the dealer set us up with a really nice, expensive hitch and sway bars that leveled it off great - but I trusted my dealer too - did a ton of research.
All this to say, there is good advice on here, and some, well, take it or leave it. I also don't drive like a crazy person so I think that helps. There are better websites also that a forum to get your figures if you have to have them - this is a forum where everyone has an opinion......
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:02 PM   #23
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You will be white knuckled, as well as everyone in the truck. Unless you have 20's (tires) you will have handling problems. I had a 2015 F150 2.7eb, and towing a shorter and lighter trailer was at times challenging. Your principle concern is passengers (who will undoubtedly grow) and cargo (ditto). A 2019 Ford SuperDuty would not only raise your towing capacity, but raise your tow vehicle load capacity. Looking at 1,100 lbs on the receiver of an F150 would REALLY put your headlights in the sky. An F250 SCrew with base engine and 6.75 ft bed has load cap of 3,057 lbs. nearly DOUBLE the F150.
Whether it's white knuckle or not is an opinion only the driver can make. I mentioned before, but there is always a more capable tow vehicle, but you sacrifice a lot. Is this a dedicated tow vehicle? I'm guessing not. That F250 crew cab gasser is going to net you 12-14 mpg while you're NOT towing. That can really add up if it's also your daily driver. The short bed also has a tiny fuel tank (34 gallons) for the kind of mileage you get while towing.
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:28 PM   #24
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I pretty much have your same set-up other than truck is a 2017 and the 267 BHSW is a 2018. Your GVWR specs look just like mine other than my trailer shows 7500 GVWR (the 267 BHS is 7000, while BHSW western version is 7500, so you might check on that a little more closely). I have a 180 lb topper, and have carried 2 more family members and a couple dogs on numerous occasions.

I have a Camco Eaz-Lift Recurve R6 weight distribution hitch with active sway control, and have towed this rig for 2 years. I tow in and out of mountains, and have been in some higher interstate driving crosswind situations with 30 mph gusts, with lots of experience with passing big rig trucks. I have definitely felt the wind gusts, but have not had any sway events that I needed to try to recover from, nor did the wind push me to the edge of a lane.

I had to brake hard one time for a deer while driving about 60 mph just before a bridge, scared hell out of me but the rig stopped straight with no jack-knifing.

The 3.5 Ecoboost has always had power to spare even when driving up 6% and higher mountain highway grades. My previous 2002 F150 with 5.4 V8 and a much lighter 25' trailer would reach its limit at about 50 mph on the same grades, whereas the 3.5 Ecoboost can hold 65 no problem without having to floor it.

Anyway, that's my experience, your results may vary.
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:30 PM   #25
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My opinion... not facts. I believe it's all prospective.. I have towed plenty of massive (5000 to 8000lb) loads with a half ton truck. Its doable for sure. I'm more of a GM guy myself but that 3.5 EcoBoost is a solid motor. I believe you will have plenty of motor to get the job done. The issue is gonna be your suspension. I personally would buy the RV you want. Then if you need to put airbags on the back suspension. Much cheaper then buying a new truck. Will you be over on your numbers probably most are and will never admit it. They will lie about their true numbers. If the numbers scare you good they should. It's just going to make you safer out there. As for your actual question. No I can all but promise you you will be over on your payload. Probably a few hundred pounds. The manufacturer all lie about their hitch weight. Most round down...
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:57 PM   #26
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My opinion... not facts. I believe it's all prospective.. I have towed plenty of massive (5000 to 8000lb) loads with a half ton truck. Its doable for sure. I'm more of a GM guy myself but that 3.5 EcoBoost is a solid motor. I believe you will have plenty of motor to get the job done. The issue is gonna be your suspension. I personally would buy the RV you want. Then if you need to put airbags on the back suspension. Much cheaper then buying a new truck. Will you be over on your numbers probably most are and will never admit it. They will lie about their true numbers. If the numbers scare you good they should. It's just going to make you safer out there. As for your actual question. No I can all but promise you you will be over on your payload. Probably a few hundred pounds. The manufacturer all lie about their hitch weight. Most round down...
With the greatest respect, Iím not sure that advising someone to get the RV they want without making sure theyíre staying within the capability of the the tow vehicle and then to put air bags on it is the best suggestion.

As the OP said he was new to towing, it should pointed out that air bags do not increase your payload capacity.
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Old 04-15-2020, 02:25 PM   #27
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With the greatest respect, I’m not sure that advising someone to get the RV they want without making sure they’re staying within the capability of the the tow vehicle and then to put air bags on it is the best suggestion.

As the OP said he was new to towing, it should pointed out that air bags do not increase your payload capacity.
Well okay I assumed he would understand that I ment to buy an RV within his truck's spec's and if it ends up a bit uncomfortable or just over his specs he can add help to his truck for a fraction of the cost of running out and getting a monster 3/4 ton or 1 ton that I have seen more flipped over pulling then half tons. And cutting his fuel economy in half. I'm not advocating for him to go get a 40 foot northpoint and try to pull it with an f150. That's commonsense. And capability of the vehicle is based mostly on prospective. Until the 90's trucks didnt even put payload, and gvwr stickers on their trucks. Heck in the 80's I knew lots of guys that put 2500lb campers on f150's and all they did was put overload springs on. Never had any problems with them.. you can't tell me that today's trucks are not superior to anything built in the 80's or even 90's for that matter. Hate to brake it to you I have over 1 million miles pulling rvs and close to 2 million miles hauling loads over 100,000 lbs. I have personally been involved with GM, Ram, and freightliner on truck design for over 15 years. I would also highly advise that before pulling he get some help from a professional or a friend that's maybe done it a few more times. Go to an empty parking lot and get a feel for his setup. Take a few short trips to easy access rv parks before he takes off for more challenging locations... there is that better? My assumption was this OP had some commonsense. Good luck and safe traveling.
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Old 04-15-2020, 02:40 PM   #28
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Well okay I assumed he would understand that I ment to buy an RV within his truck's spec's and if it ends up a bit uncomfortable or just over his specs he can add help to his truck for a fraction of the cost of running out and getting a monster 3/4 ton or 1 ton that I have seen more flipped over pulling then half tons. And cutting his fuel economy in half. I'm not advocating for him to go get a 40 foot northpoint and try to pull it with an f150. That's commonsense. And capability of the vehicle is based mostly on prospective. Until the 90's trucks didnt even put payload, and gvwr stickers on their trucks. Heck in the 80's I knew lots of guys that put 2500lb campers on f150's and all they did was put overload springs on. Never had any problems with them.. you can't tell me that today's trucks are not superior to anything built in the 80's or even 90's for that matter. Hate to brake it to you I have over 1 million miles pulling rvs and close to 2 million miles hauling loads over 100,000 lbs. I have personally been involved with GM, Ram, and freightliner on truck design for over 15 years. I would also highly advise that before pulling he get some help from a professional or a friend that's maybe done it a few more times. Go to an empty parking lot and get a feel for his setup. Take a few short trips to easy access rv parks before he takes off for more challenging locations... there is that better? My assumption was this OP had some commonsense. Good luck and safe traveling.

Agreed, and like I said, didnít mean any disrespect whatsoever. Iím no expert by any means but, like you, in my travels Iíve seen people pulling 40ft toy haulers with F-150ís and trucks pulling travel trailers with the front end of the vehicle looking like itís hard to believe the tires are even making contact and all...most likely because the dealer said ďoh your truckíll pull it just fineĒ 🤣
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Old 04-15-2020, 02:56 PM   #29
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Agreed, and like I said, didnít mean any disrespect whatsoever. Iím no expert by any means but, like you, in my travels Iíve seen people pulling 40ft toy haulers with F-150ís and trucks pulling travel trailers with the front end of the vehicle looking like itís hard to believe the tires are even making contact and all...most likely because the dealer said ďoh your truckíll pull it just fineĒ 🤣
No problem here. You were right I was not overly clear on what i ment in my post. I sometimes struggle with assuming people have commonsense. But I agree due to the number of (really smart guys) pulling trailers with 1/2 tons that I would not touch unless I had a solid 1 ton commonsense is beginning to become a thing of the past. I have seen a lifted 2500 ram pulling a 40 pluse foot toy hauler and I know forsure he was over 4000lbs of hitch weight. The thing looked stupid going down the road at 80. That moron is gonna kill people. But his logic was my 2500 is almost as good as a 1 ton. (Maybe until the genius lifted it). But yeah I agree dont intentionally go buy an RV that's too much for your truck. If you buy it get it home loaded it up and go scale it and your 2 or 300 lbs over your rear axle or gvwr. That's not a big deal get help for your suspension and you will likely be just fine. If you drive it and it's all over the road. Get some help for you suspension. If the help dosent help enough to make you more confident then I agree get a different truck.
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Old 04-15-2020, 03:02 PM   #30
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Also NEVER under any circumstances exceed your tire capacity. This is 1 of the top causes of towable rv wrecks. Trucks nowadays are over engineered. Tires on the other hand are not...
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Old 04-15-2020, 03:21 PM   #31
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Being a new RV owner myself, I was pretty concerned about that also. First off, I saw that a good WDH was number one on my list. I ended up with an Andersen Hitch. It works as advertised. My tow vehicle is a Chevy Colorado. In my research, I found a video on You-Tube, a guy that also has a Colorado and he has a really good video that he talks you through about how to do the math. He shows everything on a good spreadsheet. Check it out. You'll have to fill in the blanks with the numbers for your truck and RV. It's titled, "Can a Chevy Colorado tow an RV (Travel Trailer) He has a series called, "Traveling with the Tracys."
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Old 04-15-2020, 08:47 PM   #32
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Best advice so far...
Agree 1000%!! Some on these forums will scare the crap out of any half ton owner. My personal OPINION, is this guy should be fine. Mostly itís all the driverís self confidence. If he/she isnít comfortable, doesnít matter what others say...they should go bigger. I personally tow a 32í Jayco with a 8800 GVWR (nominally we are around 7000). Our TV is a 2018 F-150 Platinum and absolutely LOVE it! Would a 3/4 ton or 1 ton provide even more stability?? Well, duh! But if bigger is always better, why not just go with a full size semi? Well, of course that would be stupid because itís overkill. I see so many people recommending a bigger truck when a half ton will suit most people just fine. Anyway, my 5 cents worth.
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Old 04-17-2020, 11:59 AM   #33
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One thing I have noticed on these questions regarding towing is that there rarely is a mention of stopping ability of the towing vehicle!
A few years ago I had a Chevy 2500 HD pulling my TT that was under the towing weight of the trucks rating.
I was coming down a hill and the light turned red just before the intersection (very short yellow)
I had to make a panic stop not knowing my trailer brakes were not working (fuse)
The truck brakes worked hard with the help if the ABS and some tire squealing (intermittent) kept us from going through the intersection!
Needless to say the beast brought us to a safe stop but what if I was at my towing limit?
Always good to have a margin of safety, being an engineer I had 20% and glad that I did!
Sorry for being so long winded!
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Old 04-17-2020, 04:42 PM   #34
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One thing I have noticed on these questions regarding towing is that there rarely is a mention of stopping ability of the towing vehicle!
A few years ago I had a Chevy 2500 HD pulling my TT that was under the towing weight of the trucks rating.
I was coming down a hill and the light turned red just before the intersection (very short yellow)
I had to make a panic stop not knowing my trailer brakes were not working (fuse)
The truck brakes worked hard with the help if the ABS and some tire squealing (intermittent) kept us from going through the intersection!
Needless to say the beast brought us to a safe stop but what if I was at my towing limit?
Always good to have a margin of safety, being an engineer I had 20% and glad that I did!
Sorry for being so long winded!
Donít know how long ago that was, but the relatively new J2807 standard takes braking ability into consideration. Back in the day, we had to take the manufacturers word for it.
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Old 04-18-2020, 12:50 PM   #35
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Thanks!��
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