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Old 03-06-2018, 04:58 PM   #1
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Ac to DC

Hi everyone !

If I plugged in this adapter while where boon docking will it work? Or does anyone know where I can get a plug outlet that is included or easy to hook up? . Any other easy ideas out there to get power out of your batteries while boon docking ? I have a converter and an extra battery but Its a huge converter and I don't really where and how to start on hooking it up. So its a bit scary to me

As always thanks in advance.

Its seems like I cant add the picture so basically its a reg plug Ac to DC

https://geek.wish.com/search/DC%20ou...cca971d78dcf84
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:22 PM   #2
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Indygoman,

I notice no one has answered your thread so far. Perhaps that's because we can't quite figure out what it is you want to know. I certainly don't know much about electricity, but maybe I'll be able to help you clarify your question for someone who can help.

First off, there are three different electrical components which are frequently use while camping. You mention a "converter", which converts 120V A.C. power to 12V D.C. power. Your trailer has one that is used to run your lights, etc., and recharge your battery when you are hooked up to a 120V A.C. power source (such as a campground electrical pedestal. An "Inverter" converts 12V D.C. power to 120V A.C. power so you can operate the 120V outlets to run a television, hair dryer, CPAP machine, or whatever. However, you won't be able to operate them for more than 3-4 hours without dropping your battery charge below the 50% level. To run them longer (or to operate a more power consumptive device like a space heater, you'll need 2 or more batteries (either 6V or 12V) tied together. Then you'll need to recharge them using either solar or a "Generator" - the third frequently used component. They typically run off either gasoline or propane. You can either use that to plug in a battery charger to recharge your batteries, or simply plug in you RV power cord to the generator and let your RV's on-board converter recharge the battery.

Now, if you are "boon-docking" (camping without electrical hook-ups), none of your 120V A.C. outlets will work - nor will your microwave. Only the items running off your 12V D.C. battery will work: your ceiling lights, bath & stove fans, your radio, the thermostat & fan for both your refrigerator and furnace (both operating on propane), your Propane/CO detector, and your 12V D.C. "cigarette lighter style" socket (if you have one).

Since your link shows a good number of electrical components, we must ask the question "Will what work"? and "Work for what"? If you're referring to the 12V D.C. plug-in with the 120V A.C. outlet and the 2 USB ports, you could probably use it to charge your cell phone and maybe plug in a laptop or small LED TV for a couple of hours of use. Much more than that would probably drain your battery below the 50% charge level - shortening its life. Even operating the regular "on-board" 12V items listed above is going to require recharging the battery to about 90% the next day.

So, if you can be more specific about what you want to operate and for how long, and which specific electrical device (in your link) you are considering, I'm sure one of the many more electricaly-inclined members here will be happy to answer your questions.

Best of luck, and Happy Camping
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:36 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Brownie View Post
Indygoman,

I notice no one has answered your thread so far. Perhaps that's because we can't quite figure out what it is you want to know. I certainly don't know much about electricity, but maybe I'll be able to help you clarify your question for someone who can help.

First off, there are three different electrical components which are frequently use while camping. You mention a "converter", which converts 120V A.C. power to 12V D.C. power. Your trailer has one that is used to run your lights, etc., and recharge your battery when you are hooked up to a 120V A.C. power source (such as a campground electrical pedestal. An "Inverter" converts 12V D.C. power to 120V A.C. power so you can operate the 120V outlets to run a television, hair dryer, CPAP machine, or whatever. However, you won't be able to operate them for more than 3-4 hours without dropping your battery charge below the 50% level. To run them longer (or to operate a more power consumptive device like a space heater, you'll need 2 or more batteries (either 6V or 12V) tied together. Then you'll need to recharge them using either solar or a "Generator" - the third frequently used component. They typically run off either gasoline or propane. You can either use that to plug in a battery charger to recharge your batteries, or simply plug in you RV power cord to the generator and let your RV's on-board converter recharge the battery.

Now, if you are "boon-docking" (camping without electrical hook-ups), none of your 120V A.C. outlets will work - nor will your microwave. Only the items running off your 12V D.C. battery will work: your ceiling lights, bath & stove fans, your radio, the thermostat & fan for both your refrigerator and furnace (both operating on propane), your Propane/CO detector, and your 12V D.C. "cigarette lighter style" socket (if you have one).

Since your link shows a good number of electrical components, we must ask the question "Will what work"? and "Work for what"? If you're referring to the 12V D.C. plug-in with the 120V A.C. outlet and the 2 USB ports, you could probably use it to charge your cell phone and maybe plug in a laptop or small LED TV for a couple of hours of use. Much more than that would probably drain your battery below the 50% charge level - shortening its life. Even operating the regular "on-board" 12V items listed above is going to require recharging the battery to about 90% the next day.

So, if you can be more specific about what you want to operate and for how long, and which specific electrical device (in your link) you are considering, I'm sure one of the many more electricaly-inclined members here will be happy to answer your questions.

Best of luck, and Happy Camping
Thanks, Yah its hard for me to explain because I am not really sure how to ask :-) Its all new to me .BUT you did very well in explaining what I am trying to get at. So having said that how hard would it be to install 12V D.C. "cigarette lighter style" socket in the trailer if i add a second battery.....Thanks in advance Brownie :-)
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Old 03-11-2018, 05:21 PM   #4
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Installing a 12v cigarette type outlet is not overly difficult for someone who knows how to run a separate circuit, or knows where to safely tap into an existing circuit. The question is, what do you want to run off that 12v jack? What amp load?

You mentioned, "if I add a second battery". Adding a second battery is not directly related to adding a 12v jack. A second battery will increase your available amp hours, or your ability to boondock for longer periods between charges, but the critical thing with your 12v jack is making sure the circuit it's on is capable of handling your intended load.

Adding a second battery is fairly easy. If you're adding another 12v battery, you'll run them in parallel, and all you need is a short length of cable and the hardware to physically attach the batteries to the tongue. I would caution against adding a second battery to your existing battery, as your new battery and your old battery will likely not play well together. Two batteries used in the same bank should be as close to identical, including same age and history as possible. If you're considering two batteries, you'd be wise to replace your existing 12v battery with a pair of 6v golf cart batteries and run them in series.

If this isn't making sense, you might go to Amazon and find a book that covers the basics of 12v systems. That would probably be the fasted way to get a 12v education.
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:21 PM   #5
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Thank you
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:33 PM   #6
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This is a good article on "the 12 volt side of life" here.
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