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Old 05-08-2019, 05:35 PM   #1
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30a shore power cord

I have seen comments about laying out the cord completely to reduce over heating. How many follow this practice. No knowledge of electricity just seems that is the cord over heated it would trip a breaker..help me understand this.
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Old 05-08-2019, 05:44 PM   #2
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Never laid out the cord completely. Before I changed over to a removal power cord I pulled the cord all the way out of camper just cause I could. Now, my cord is dropped on the ground, plugged Into camper an plugged into power. If its half ass coiled or half ass stretched out dont care. No fire, no heat, no nothing. Cords will not build heat from electricity unless there is an issue with the power outlet or unit receiving the power.
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Old 05-08-2019, 05:46 PM   #3
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When I used to pull out the cord from camper I didn't lay it out either. Again half ass coiled, half ass not coiled. Just how it hit the ground
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Old 05-08-2019, 05:56 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Woodworker View Post
Never laid out the cord completely. Before I changed over to a removal power cord I pulled the cord all the way out of camper just cause I could. Now, my cord is dropped on the ground, plugged Into camper an plugged into power. If its half ass coiled or half ass stretched out dont care. No fire, no heat, no nothing. Cords will not build heat from electricity unless there is an issue with the power outlet or unit receiving the power.



That's not actually true. If your using near the max power, it will create heat. And if the cord is coiled it can't dissipate the heat. In extreme cases you can melt the coating on the cord. Best practice is to pull it out so as to mitigate the potential for heat build up. It's the same principle as to why they limit the number of wires in a given size metal conduit.



That being said, it's not typical, but it does happen, especially in warmer weather when the outside temp is high plus the AC is pulling max for long periods of time.



The breaker will trip only when it pulls more power than the breaker is built for, typically the pedestal breaker will pop before the RV breaker, just from use and wear and tear. Again it is heat that trips the breaker, similar to heat that melts the filament in a fuse. I told the story before, but one campground I worked at, I had to actually ice down the old breakers on an extremely hot day when everyone returned from the lake and kicked the AC's on. Combination of fuse panel in direct sun, behind the fuse panels were all the compressors for the freezers in the store, and, the campground was over 50 years old. We got by the hour or so when it started to cool down and the sun was low behind trees and the breakers quit tripping.



Heat build up was the culprit.



Just as easy to pull most of the cord out, and let it lay under the RV, allowing the heat to dissipate


Happy Camping.. We leave this weekend heading East this year.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:00 PM   #5
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Our cord is stored in its own storage compartment, all 35 feet of it so i do not want to pull it all out each time i only need 10 ft to connect to shore power. After reading about possible over heating in enclosed storage area itwanted some comments...thanks
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:14 PM   #6
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Thanks, in the last 5 yrs we maybe used the a/c 6 times for short periods, so we should be good not removing the cord completely from its storage compartment in our 2019 class c. We do not tow a toad so move frequently for site seeing, beach and shopping.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:50 PM   #7
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Thanks, in the last 5 yrs we maybe used the a/c 6 times for short periods, so we should be good not removing the cord completely from its storage compartment in our 2019 class c. We do not tow a toad so move frequently for site seeing, beach and shopping.
I have to laugh when someone asks a question and they don't like the correct answer so they continue to do what they have been doing when its not safe.
Wags999 is right on with his answer, always pull the cord all the way out.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:00 PM   #8
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There are two issues being discussed as one.

If a cord is carrying more power than it is rated for it can get hot. But your RV cord should be rated to carry all the power your AC or other electric demand without overheating. If you ever notice a hot plug it is probably due to a bad outlet. If your power cord is overheating, you have too much demand.

Coiled power cords can make a magnetic field and there is the possibility of causing heat due to that. But it is really unlikely with the jumbled coil when you push the cable into the cubby of most RVs.

This is not my worry compared to a lot of other things. I have never felt any warmth on any of my RVs over 45 years.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:07 PM   #9
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There are two issues being discussed as one.

If a cord is carrying more power than it is rated for it can get hot. But your RV cord should be rated to carry all the power your AC or other electric demand without overheating. If you ever notice a hot plug it is probably due to a bad outlet. If your power cord is overheating, you have too much demand.

Coiled power cords can make a magnetic field and there is the possibility of causing heat due to that. But it is really unlikely with the jumbled coil when you push the cable into the cubby of most RVs.

This is not my worry compared to a lot of other things. I have never felt any warmth on any of my RVs over 45 years.
This place is starting to sound like Facebook with all the bad advise. Read the National Electrical Code.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:24 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by RogerR View Post
There are two issues being discussed as one.

If a cord is carrying more power than it is rated for it can get hot. But your RV cord should be rated to carry all the power your AC or other electric demand without overheating. If you ever notice a hot plug it is probably due to a bad outlet. If your power cord is overheating, you have too much demand.

Coiled power cords can make a magnetic field and there is the possibility of causing heat due to that. But it is really unlikely with the jumbled coil when you push the cable into the cubby of most RVs.

This is not my worry compared to a lot of other things. I have never felt any warmth on any of my RVs over 45 years.



From what you have said, I would assume you would find it okay to run extension cords under rugs etc. Yes your cord is rated to carry the power your RV needs.. BUT... it has to be in open air to allow heat to dissipate. Same as in conduit, even metal conduit, you can only run a certain number of wires, where the power company can run much more power on their overhead wires BECAUSE they are in free air...and heat can dissipate. Do what you want, but your not following best practices or common sense. Yes cords even on a single appliance will heat up...and if you coil them in an enclosed environment your asking for trouble.



There is no "cord patrol" so use your free will to do whatever you want, because, i've never had an issue before...until you do.



Happy Camping... i've got an RV to get ready to leave !
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