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Old 04-05-2015, 09:01 PM   #1
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165 Sport How Much Air Pressure

I have a 165 a 2005 with the 13 inch wheels. How much air should I run in them? Side says max is 65 PSI cold.
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:30 PM   #2
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165 Sport How Much Air Pressure

Should be a sticker on your unit that states max air pressure. Mine is on the back side of the trailer near the front.

My sticker states to run them at 50psi, but yours could be different.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:03 PM   #3
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there should be a yellow sticker. being a 2005 it maybe faded. If I recall correctly, mine is on the driver's side wall near the very front. I think I saw another small one somewhere inside, but my HTT is still in winter storage, so I cannot look.

You can contact Jayco with your vin number and asked for OEM tire specifications, and they should send you Jayco's tire size as it left the shop and recommended tire pressure.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:49 PM   #4
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Jayco builds trailers. Jayco buys tires. I prefer to listen to the tire manufacturers who build the tires that Jayco buys. I run all my trailer tires at max sidewall pressure as the tire manufacturers recommend.

Some info copied from another thread. It includes some references for those who want more information.

***********************************

Per standards Special Trailer tires are speed rated to 65 mph, not 60 mph. Sorry to be a broken record, but anyone who runs their trailer tires at too low a pressure may be setting themselves up for tire failure and even handling problems. You don't need to listen to me, you can research what the experts recommend in the links below.

A Canned Response

Most special trailer tires are speed rated to 65 mph. Speed rated is not speed limited. Tire pressure can affect the speed range. Too little tire pressure is a greater sin than too much pressure. Consult your tire manufacturer information.

Personally I would not run my trailer tires at less than the max rated pressure listed on the sidewall. In my experience that mode gives good wear and puts the tire in a range for higher speeds.

Below is some specific information for
Goodyear Marathon Tires

Special Trailer ("ST") Tires

Goodyear Marathon trailer tires are widely used in a variety of towable trailer applications and are designed and branded as "ST" (Special Trailer) tires.

• Industry standards dictate that tires with the ST designation are speed rated at 65 MPH (104 km/h) under normal inflation and load conditions.

• Based on these industry standards , if tires with the ST designation are used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph (106 km/h and 121 km/h), it is necessary to increase the cold inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) above the recommended pressure for the rated maximum load .

o Increasing the inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) does not provide any additional load carrying capacity.
o Do not exceed the maximum pressure for the wheel.
o If the maximum pressure for the wheel prohibits the increase of air pressure, then the maximum speed must be restricted to 65 mph (104 km/h).
o The cold inflation pressure must not exceed 10 psi (69 kPa) beyond the inflation specified for the maximum load of the tire.

More info is here:
http://www.tirerack.com/images/tires...plications.pdf

If the link doesn't work then just add www. to this

tirerack.com/images/tires/goodyear/Marathon_Special_Trailer_Applications.pdf

What Carlisle says:

Inflation

Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure. Low
inflation pressure elevates tread temperature, especially as speed
increases.

Review - Practices for Safe Trailer Tire Use

– Maintain air pressure at the maximum PSI recommended on the
tire sidewall.

http://www.carlisletransportationpro..._Practices.pdf

What etrailer says:

Expert Reply:
Trailer tires should ALWAYS be inflated to the maximum psi rating as indicated on the tire without exception. The reason is that if under inflated, because trailer tires are built with a thicker side wall to handle more vertical load, a lower pressure will cause excessive heat build up and cause the tire to fail.

Maximum Air Pressure for the Wheel in the Trailer Tire and Wheel Combo # TW15BIAS5ON475 | etrailer.com

http://www.etrailer.com/question-40711.html

vic

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Old 04-06-2015, 07:45 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help. I had one get hot on me last year when I pulled over for gas.

So at max pressure cold lets say 65psi, when the tire gets hot how much psi are we talking about?
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Old 04-06-2015, 08:56 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverta16 View Post
Thanks for the help. I had one get hot on me last year when I pulled over for gas.

So at max pressure cold lets say 65psi, when the tire gets hot how much psi are we talking about?
Clipped from etrailer.com

Link:
Maximum Air Pressure for the Wheel in the Trailer Tire and Wheel Combo # TW15BIAS5ON475 | etrailer.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by etrailer
The rule of thumb for tire pressure and temperature is that for every 10 degrees in temperature change from whatever the temperature is when you inflate the tires to the max, it will equal 1 pound of pressure change in the tire.

For example, if you check the tires at 8:00 and they are at 50 psi and it is 70 degrees, then later, at noon it has warmed up to 80 degrees, the psi would be 51. This extra pound of pressure will not hurt the tire. Tire and wheel manufactures know that pressures are going to change and build the products with some tolerances like this. The warranty will not be affected.
The 1# per ten degree F change mentioned above is a very loose rule of thumb.

The manufacturers know that the tires will heat up when in use which will cause the pressures to rise. They specify "Cold Inflation" because that is a more stable range than the varying running temperatures of tires on the road. The expected rise in operating temperatures is designed in. Never check/change the pressures based upon hot operating tire pressures.

I strongly suggest that every trailer owner reads or at least skims the Carlisle information. There are just 3 pages.

http://www.carlisletransportationpro..._Practices.pdf

vic
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Old 04-06-2015, 09:36 AM   #7
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Thanks a bunch.
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