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Old 08-21-2015, 06:07 AM   #11
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I have the 2014 F150 Eco-boost rated for 11,000_lbs towing (3.73 gears). My toy hauler is 8000_lbs max and is about all I want to tow with the toys on board.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:11 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by NVGun40 View Post
The issue that caused the wreck was a case of "the tale wagging the dog".
Not trying to discredit your friend, but i'm guessing there's more to the story than just the tail wagging the dog. Speed, distracted driving, soft tires/incorrect tires (overloaded), weather conditions and the list im sure could go on.
Ive been towing with short wheel base vehicles for years and haven't run into any issues that couldn't be corrected with a change of one of those culprit's (speed being the biggie). Sure, Ive had some white knuckle situations, but nothing where I ever felt like I was going to loose control of the vehicle.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:31 AM   #13
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Since you have given us your payload this is a pretty easy one to calculate......

7200GVWR - 6020 scale weight = 1180lbs of remaining payload. Not what is listed on your door jamb sticker.

Trailer weight of 6498 + 2200lbs of your stuff and toys = 8690lbs

Toy hauler tongue weights can actually decrease from the dry weight as you load the heavy stuff in the back but....

8690 x 12% = 1043lbs as a rough estimate. It could be as high as 1300lbs which would be above the rating on your hitch.

Add another passenger or anything into the truck and you will be over your GVWR.

So if you don't want to be over any limits that trailer is probably too much for your truck.

Cheers
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:17 AM   #14
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Welcome to the Forum JCarver.

I agree with Plowtoy. The best advice I can offer is to disregard the advice from the "experts" at one end of the spectrum that state that any trailer over 4,000 pounds requires a 350/3500 or that somebody's brother's cousin got in an accident and got sued 20 years ago because they were pulling an RV with a half ton. On the other end of the spectrum you need to ignore the expertise from those that have towed for years completely oblivious to the weights and measures of their tow vehicles for years and have never had a problem therefore their setup must be perfect.

You are doing the right thing carefully considering both your tow vehicle's payload capacity and tow capacity. I agree with some of the posters that you will be close on payload and it will depend on what you want to put in the truck and trailer while travelling to your eventual campsites. The mistake many "experts" make taking for granted that all half tons have the same ratings. For example if in 2014, if Truck “A” is an F150 with HD Payload and Max Tow package it actually has a higher payload rating than a base F250 with the 6.7 Powerstroke (in most configurations). Of course that does not mean your truck with the Ecoboost will tow any trailer, even a 4000 lb trailer, up a mountain as quickly as an F250 with the 6.7 Powerstroke (which has double the torque) but that is a personal choice based on your available finances. Based on what I have seen on some of the diesel forums, even a lot F250 owners with 6.7’s with 880 ft lbs of torque “need” an extra 400 ft lbs of torque. At the other end of the spectrum, a 2014 F150 with the 3.7 non eco and 3.31 gears does not have anywhere near the towing capacity of your truck, despite the fact that they are both F150 “half-tons”.

The above examples are provided to illustrate the inaccuracy of generalizations and the need to carefully consider your particular truck and the trailer you will be towing. If you do decide to proceed, knowing that you are close to limits, you may wish to consider equipping your truck with a helper spring or air bags as well as investing in a good quality hitch with WD and anti-sway. If you decide to upgrade your tow vehicle, based on your needs, you can decide between an F150 fully equipped for towing or to incur the additional expense of a diesel F250. Nobody who has done any amount of towing will tell you that they would prefer to tow a trailer of any weight with an F150 instead of a modern Diesel F250. On the other hand to state that you “need” a ¾ quarter ton or a one ton for the trailer you are considering is simply bad advice.

For myself, the fact that I use my F150 as a daily driver for work and would not be able to get an F250 into many parking garages downtown plus the additional up front costs factored into my decision of an F150. The 5.4 was the gas motor and 3.73 axle ratio that was an option in the gas F250 in 2010. When towing, I am within my payload and gvwr, but I do not carry full water tanks and I load my trailer and truck carefully knowing that I am close on payload. I have a very good quality hitch and I have spent some time adjusting the height and WD on it. I have not had any white knuckle experiences with my current setups despite towing under many different circumstances, except for emergency stops caused by unforeseeable accidents in front of me and deer etc. on the highway on my way to or from campgrounds and I am very comfortable with safety of my setup for my family and I. I leave a comfortable distance to the vehicle in front and have always been able to maintain the speed limit which is far safer than some of the F250’s that have blown by me on multi-lane highways at speeds far in excess of the speed ratings on their trailer tires (unless there are some high speed trailer tires that I have not heard of).
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:31 AM   #15
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You go Steve!
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Old 08-21-2015, 12:12 PM   #16
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Sage advice from Steve.
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Old 08-21-2015, 01:08 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Ottawasteve View Post
Welcome to the Forum JCarver.

I agree with Plowtoy. The best advice I can offer is to disregard the advice from the "experts" at one end of the spectrum that state that any trailer over 4,000 pounds requires a 350/3500 or that somebody's brother's cousin got in an accident and got sued 20 years ago because they were pulling an RV with a half ton. On the other end of the spectrum you need to ignore the expertise from those that have towed for years completely oblivious to the weights and measures of their tow vehicles for years and have never had a problem therefore their setup must be perfect.

You are doing the right thing carefully considering both your tow vehicle's payload capacity and tow capacity. I agree with some of the posters that you will be close on payload and it will depend on what you want to put in the truck and trailer while travelling to your eventual campsites. The mistake many "experts" make taking for granted that all half tons have the same ratings. For example if in 2014, if Truck “A” is an F150 with HD Payload and Max Tow package it actually has a higher payload rating than a base F250 with the 6.7 Powerstroke (in most configurations). Of course that does not mean your truck with the Ecoboost will tow any trailer, even a 4000 lb trailer, up a mountain as quickly as an F250 with the 6.7 Powerstroke (which has double the torque) but that is a personal choice based on your available finances. Based on what I have seen on some of the diesel forums, even a lot F250 owners with 6.7’s with 880 ft lbs of torque “need” an extra 400 ft lbs of torque. At the other end of the spectrum, a 2014 F150 with the 3.7 non eco and 3.31 gears does not have anywhere near the towing capacity of your truck, despite the fact that they are both F150 “half-tons”.

The above examples are provided to illustrate the inaccuracy of generalizations and the need to carefully consider your particular truck and the trailer you will be towing. If you do decide to proceed, knowing that you are close to limits, you may wish to consider equipping your truck with a helper spring or air bags as well as investing in a good quality hitch with WD and anti-sway. If you decide to upgrade your tow vehicle, based on your needs, you can decide between an F150 fully equipped for towing or to incur the additional expense of a diesel F250. Nobody who has done any amount of towing will tell you that they would prefer to tow a trailer of any weight with an F150 instead of a modern Diesel F250. On the other hand to state that you “need” a ¾ quarter ton or a one ton for the trailer you are considering is simply bad advice.

For myself, the fact that I use my F150 as a daily driver for work and would not be able to get an F250 into many parking garages downtown plus the additional up front costs factored into my decision of an F150. The 5.4 was the gas motor and 3.73 axle ratio that was an option in the gas F250 in 2010. When towing, I am within my payload and gvwr, but I do not carry full water tanks and I load my trailer and truck carefully knowing that I am close on payload. I have a very good quality hitch and I have spent some time adjusting the height and WD on it. I have not had any white knuckle experiences with my current setups despite towing under many different circumstances, except for emergency stops caused by unforeseeable accidents in front of me and deer etc. on the highway on my way to or from campgrounds and I am very comfortable with safety of my setup for my family and I. I leave a comfortable distance to the vehicle in front and have always been able to maintain the speed limit which is far safer than some of the F250’s that have blown by me on multi-lane highways at speeds far in excess of the speed ratings on their trailer tires (unless there are some high speed trailer tires that I have not heard of).
Thanks for all the advice. This forum as been really helpful.
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:07 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by SilverEscape View Post
The max tongue weight allowed for the receiver on the 2014 F-150 is 1130 pounds. So if the dry tongue is already 1000, I'd say there's no way you'll be able to keep it under the max allowed tongue weight.

Even if you decide to ignore Ford's manual on the subject and go by the stickers on the receiver, that gives you only 1150 pounds max tongue weight. Now that's on my receiver with the Max Tow option. I don't know if all models have the same receiver although I believe they do.

http://www.ford.com/resources/ford/g...F150_Sep11.pdf

Here's a pic of my 2014 F-150 receiver sticker. Note that my max towing capacity is 11,200 pounds, not the 11,500 that the receiver maxes out at. And my truck's GVWR is 7650.

Attachment 19800
My sticker is exactly the same, never realized that. Interesting. Even the Superduty hitch tongue weights max at 1250 if you use the 2" hitch adapter it appears (see footnotes), https://secure.ford.com/resources/fo...tyPU_Sep30.pdf

So should all of us with over 1250lb tongue weights be using 2.5" receivers and class V receivers here?!?!?
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