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Old 04-07-2015, 07:30 AM   #11
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To the OP: when you brought the travel trailer home, how did it do? If it did not strain, swerve, or brake difficultly, then why worry what others are telling you?
A little drive with the truck and trailer empty is a heck of a lot different than fully loaded with the family on board going over hill and dale.
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Old 04-07-2015, 08:33 AM   #12
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A lot of TVs are capable of "pulling" the load down the road. But if someone cuts you off, or some other emergency arises - a tire blowout, for example - are you confident that your TV will be able to "control" that load behind you? Will the tail be wagging the dog? This is something only you can answer, considering the safety of you, your loved ones in the TV with you, and others on the road.

Just something to think about.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:55 PM   #13
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Handles just fine. Breaking is good. Driving under 80 kph is fine. it is only on The highway I am not so sure in for the fact in don't want to tear the truck up trying to pull something it should not. Pulled a lot of trailers driving truck for a moving company. Know how to handle the rig. More worried about power. And yes I know car trailers handle differently then tractor trailers.
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Old 04-08-2015, 05:28 AM   #14
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A little drive with the truck and trailer empty is a heck of a lot different than fully loaded with the family on board going over hill and dale.
Sure. But you have to walk before you run.

One does need to do the homework required initially, and with calculated loads (including people, gear, food, TV and TT), verify you are within the limits. I believe the OP had done this, but was concerned with the overdrive shifting in and out, and the speeds they were able to manage. So if the driver is comfortable with the handling with everything in tow, that is a key step in the right direction. If there is any doubt, correct it.

How many folks here headed over to their RV store with a full camping gear load to "test drive" the newly purchased TT home? If I'm the oddball that did not do this, then my bad.
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Old 04-08-2015, 06:13 AM   #15
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One other consideration that most people do not think about - IF you should have an accident due to a blowout, crosswinds, etc, and your insurance company determines your TV was overloaded, they may use that as an excuse to deny payment. And we all know that's what insurance companies are best at - wiggling out of paying.

When I bought my Outback 29BHS some years ago, I found my 1500 Suburban was really overloaded and struggled to pull uphill and handle the load. When I upgraded to my 3/4-ton pickup, the difference was like night and day.

I'm going to guess that if you add up your actual tongue weight, gear, firewood, and other stuff in your truck bed, and all passengers, you are exceeding the GVWR for your truck. I always recommend doing that homework, but didn't this time. But in the end, the decision is yours.
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Old 04-08-2015, 06:39 AM   #16
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The gcvwr is 9000lbs. The owners manual post a 4000 lbs towing limit. So the trailer is just over 3000lbs the truck is just under 3000lbs. That leaves about 3000 lbs. For cargo and people. I have even check with the MTO and this is a legal set up in Ontario. Tires are fine and will take the weight and breaks work great on both TV and TT. And I know to keep 300lbs or less in the TT. I'm only worried about the motor and transmission
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:18 AM   #17
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The gcvwr is 9000lbs. The owners manual post a 4000 lbs towing limit. So the trailer is just over 3000lbs the truck is just under 3000lbs. That leaves about 3000 lbs. For cargo and people. I have even check with the MTO and this is a legal set up in Ontario. Tires are fine and will take the weight and breaks work great on both TV and TT. And I know to keep 300lbs or less in the TT. I'm only worried about the motor and transmission
You assessment of how GCVWR being within the limit is flawed. The TT tongue weight + WD hitch weigh + any thing in the truck including passengers is what you need to watch closely. All of these items go against the trucks GVWR, and that is the limit you will exceed far before the GCVRW.

As for the transmission searching for a the correct gear when towing, if this happens frequently that will put undo wear on the transmission. When I towed with a 1500 gasser I kept it in 3rd always, OD was just tall of a gear.

It sounds like you might be at the limit of what your truck will support, if not exceeding one or more limits a bit. As we always suggest, you need to make a trip to the scales to confirm.

Simply saying you have 3000lbs for people and cargo is just wrong. My 2500 Durmax doesn't even have 3000lbs available for people and cargo.
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:43 AM   #18
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You assessment of how GCVWR being within the limit is flawed. The TT tongue weight + WD hitch weigh + any thing in the truck including passengers is what you need to watch closely. All of these items go against the trucks GVWR, and that is the limit you will exceed far before the GCVRW.

Simply saying you have 3000lbs for people and cargo is just wrong. My 2500 Durmax doesn't even have 3000lbs available for people and cargo.
Clubhouse is correct. The GCVWR is the weight limit your truck's powertrain is designed "pull," which is different than the GVWR, which is the weight limit (payload) your truck can safely "carry." Most RV salesmen try to confuse prospective buyers with the GCVWR, telling them, "your truck can pull this trailer easily." If they told them the truth, and pointed to the GVWR, folks would buy smaller, less expensive trailers, knowing they will have to upgrade their tow vehicle to pull the larger, more expensive trailer. It happens every day.

My 2500HD Crew Cab has a sticker inside the door that says my payload capacity is 3800#. That includes people, stuff in the bed, my truck topper, tongue weight, and the weight of the hitch itself (which isn't light!). THAT is the number that folks should be paying attention to. I know you have experience driving big rigs, but as you pointed out earlier, this is a different ball game.

But again, the choice is entirely up to you. Not trying to imply anything negative, I am simply looking out for a fellow RV'er. I just hope I've helped. That's my intent.
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Old 04-08-2015, 04:29 PM   #19
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Clubhouse, Scoutr2 gvrw is 5300 lbs and the truck is 2875. I know you need to watch the weight and I know I can't really pull my trailer and load 3000lbs in my truck. 4 people my hitch and some gear and cooler will not be over my limit. I know this is getting close to what the truck can take for weight. If it did not feel safe I would not do it. I have talked to people that have and still pull bigger and heaver trailers and say they have no problem. I don't think I would go any larger then what I got now with out a larger TV.
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