Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-02-2011, 06:34 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 30
Seasonal Camp Site - (Informative Info)

We have decided this year to get a seasonal site at a nice campground. We have never done this and I was looking for some advice or tips anyone may have about camping this way. Thank you.
__________________

__________________
2008 Toyota tundra 5.7l I-force V8
2009 Jayflight 26bh
jonathan28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:05 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,646
Sorry this is abit long, but gives you an idea of what we did. DW and I are on our 4th year at a seasonal site. We did our fair share of traveling and seeing the sites with the kids. When we first considered a seasonal site we wanted something that was within a 2 hour driving distance from home. Friends have a cabin in northern Wisconsin. Beautiful, yes. But a 5 hour drive puts them up there pretty late Friday night and they have to get an early start Sunday morning to beat the traffic heading south. They end up spending alot of weekend time on the road IMHO.

We checked out several booths at an RV show and searched the internet for places that would meet our needs/wants list. Lake, boat rentals, pool, large sites, owner not corporation owned, activities, friendly atmosphere, quiet family type not a constant party place, you get the idea. We came up with a short list of about 8 places, called each one to make an appointment, and spent a couple weekends visiting different campgrounds. Being used to state and national parks we were surprised at how tight some of the seasonal sites were at a couple places. I don't want my awning 10' from the back of the camper next to me. And some of the campers and sites didn't look all that well maintained so it gave me an idea of what the place was like. Lesson learned - don't go by the pictures in the brochures or on the internet, they can be misleading. We pulled into #7 out of 8 on our list, a small (167 seasonal and weekend sites) gated campground and were greeted by the most friendly owners/operators. They drove us around in their golf cart and toured the facility checking out the 4 seasonal sites that were available. Only 4 sites open let me to believe there wasn't a large turnover, must be a good reason. On our tour we noticed both the public grounds and individual sites were very well maintained. The sites were very large. Bathrooms were some of the cleanest I had ever seen. After the tour they went over the rules/policies/contract with us and thanked us for our interest in their campground. DW and I then decided to walk around and talk to some of the seasonals, asking them how they liked the place, any problems with noise, etc. Got nothing but positive comments and feedback. We left with a very good feeling and headed to see #8 on our list, which was a total waste of time after seeing the place we were just at. We decided on a site and went back to place #7 to sign a contract. We've made alot of new friends and had great times.

So to sum it up:

1. Decide what kind of place you want. There are quiet family oriented campgrounds that cater to families with kids and there are places that are like Las Vegas all night.

2. What amenities are important to you? Close to golf courses? Shopping/groceries close by? Fishing lake or river? Restaurant/bar on site? Pool/hot tub? Large shaded sites? Do they have an LP filling station? What else is there to do hearby? etc.

3. With gas prices being what they are, and probably going to get worse, how far do you want to drive to get away. Set a drive time window and try to stay within it.
We set ours at 2 hours and are at exactly 2 hours. Close, but still far enough to feel like we are really getting away.

4. 30 or 50 amp, sewer or septic, do they allow decks, sheds, golf carts. What are the quiet times.

5. Compare rates and what they include. We didn't have to pay for our 300 gallon inground holding tank and it's pumped out every 2 weeks as part of the yearly rate.

6. Can you leave the unit there all year or do you have to pull it out during winter. Of course this depends if winter is an issue where you live.

7. Expect electric to be metered and to pay what you use, just like at home.

8. Walk around and talk to other seasonals. Find out what they like/don't like about the place. Check out everything, bathrooms, store, game room, etc. Every campground has rules, but the extent to which they are enforced varies, ask. What is the turnover like and why?

9. Just about everyplace will have planned weekend activities. Find out what they are and how they fit into your interests/lifestyle.

10. If you haven't already done so invest in a water filter. A torpedo one from WalMart will work. Get a good quality sewer hose. The ones that come standard with a camper aren't the best and spend most of the time in the bumper storage and not exposed to the elements. Get a surge protector, it's cheap insurance considering what it will cost to replace all the electronics in your camper: TV, DVD/stereo, fridge, furnace, converter/inverter, HWH, etc. Campground electric can be spotty. I got a Progressive Industries one from Tweety's. Link:http://tweetys.com/progressive-indus...rotectors.aspx

11. Do your homework, take your time and keep an open mind. You will find a place that's just right for you, but it will take some effort.

Hope this helps.
__________________

wiscampsin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:08 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 414
Hi there...

Due to my disabled child (who cannot take change very well), we have our 2006 Jayco FBS at a seasonal site.

Our TT is supported by many 6-ton axle stands - which are sitting on large patio stone pads. If wondering, these stands are placed 6 feet part - down each frame rail. Thus, making its natural floor movement firm (solid). To view jack stand placements, surf: http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0696.jpg

Our TT is connected to both water and 110/120V - 30 Amp Service. To ensure folks don't accidently flip over these lines (when walking behind our TT), these lines are burried approx 4" under the ground. Having these service lines under the ground is great for cutting grass as well. If wondering, our water and electrical are NOT metered. But, they do ask we turn off all lighting and AC when NOT using our TT. And, we keep the main water valve shut when NOT using our TT as well.

For our Peddle bikes (epecially my disabled son's 3-wheel peddle bike) and other items, we have a little 6ft x 8ft steel shed. This shed is tapcon on patio stones, which are on 2x4s, which is on plastic sheet. At our seasonal site, no gravel is allowed. This plastic sheet and 2x4s keep the floor shed "floating" and level.

Our TT can remain "on the spot" during the winter storage months as well. Some seasonal sites make you move your TT. For our current seasonal site, our TT remains "on spot" and our winter storage fee of $400 is subtracted from future summer seasons fee. Thus, our TT gets free winter storage.

Our TT has a small deck on its front side - which is sitting on mid-size flat patio stones as well. This floating deck also has 12V lighting. If wondering, this portable deck was created using sections and horizontal bolts. Thus, it can easily be split into 5.25ft by 9.5ft sections - to be transported in our 6x10 utility trailer. For pictures, surf http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_1352.jpg & http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_1388.jpg & http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...-Trailer-1.jpg

If wondering, our seasonal site TT is 1.5 hours drive away from our current home. 1.75 hours when traffic congestion is bad. If wondering, we love our seasonal site area so much, my wife & I want to move to that region. Hopefully, we can buy a future "lake front" properly in 5 years. And, spend the next 5 years building our dream home (and our TT will be used during its main construction year). Only time will tell. As many emphasis with home ownership & seasonal site visiting, always focus on "location, location, location".

This May, I'll be installing a "hard top" cover over our TT's large slide. Being a seasonal site, this top can be hard - instead of traditional soft awning. If wondering, our slide roof is starting to leak - because of its factory flat contruction. Our hard top will have a low slope - just enough slope to keep its natural rain water off.

We also have our canoe / kayaks for our water adventures as well. re: http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...-Trailer-1.jpg

Everything at our seasonal site must be "cleared away" under 24 hours. No gravel, no posts and no cutting down trees / branches. Floating patio stones are allowed. If some base items need to change, I simply ask my CG owner to inspect. And if needed, he removes the items (like the large tree branches that were almost rubbing our TT's roof). He removed those long overhead branches under a few short hours. We only cut our grass. And being "in the shade", we only need to cut our double lot's grass (which is every other weekend). And, the CG owner provide the lawnmower (and fuel).

When investigating lots at different seasonal sites, always ask for grouped sections based your specific lifestyle. If wondering, I don't drink (I buy canoe / Kayaks instead) and don't smoke (I bought our 2006 Jayco with that money instead). And, I'm a "lights out" at 11:00 PM type person as well. Thus, I asked for a "double lot" against the fence-line - located in the quet family section. Theres is others to camp to party (and drink their brains out). The seasonal site CG owner puts those folks in a different section. And, other folks want to along on the lake side (which tends to have more people traffic). When looking for a lot, remember to ask for specific lifestyle sections as well. If the seasonal site doesn't group the people, look for a different seasonal camp ground. Especially if you have young kids or have specific needs (like my disabled son).

For our situation, we love our seasonal site. Works great for our son - who cannot handle too much change.

Hope this helps...
Spike99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 11:39 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 30
Thanks for all the good info. When you guys leave for the week, do you leave the tt plugged in, propane on as a backup for the fridge, leave slide out or bring it in, etc.....
__________________
2008 Toyota tundra 5.7l I-force V8
2009 Jayflight 26bh
jonathan28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 11:50 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 414
.

At my seasonal site, our TT's slide remains out and awning remains out during camping season. Out in the spring and in at fall time. And, it remains in during the winter storage months.

To reduce risk of awning beam from bending (due to heavy rains / strong winds), our large awning has a middle support as well. re: Both horizontal and vertical middle support. And, its one corner is always lower (then its other side). Thus, good rain flow slope. For an awning vertical / horizontal adjustable support (which is avalable at my RV dealers), surf: http://www.awningassist.com/

While away for the week (since we mostly camp weekends during the summer), its main water valve is OFF. Propane tank valve is ON, its 110/120V 30 Amp remains ON, and our 12V manual switch remains ON. And, our fridge setting is set to AUTO. Meaning, it will "auto flip" from default electrical power to 12V + propane power (when main electricity accidentlly goes out).

Behind our fridge, I also installed 1 x 120mm high speed 12V computer fan, with an manual OFF/On switch. re: http://www.quietpc.com/files/images/...slipstream.jpg During the hot temp months (or during a hot temp day), I will turn this fan ON. Thus, ensuring nice air flow across the rear coils of the fridge. At night (when sleeping), I turn this fan OFF. For picture, surf: http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0589.jpg

If wondering, we bring most of our food and clean clothes Friday night, and take away our dirty clothes Sunday night. Only stuff that remains in our TT's fridge is items that can last a long time. re: Musturd, Catchup, Pickles, cans of pop, some frozen food items, etc. Most of our dry goods (like cookies and cereal) is stored in tin or plastic containers as well. Thus, being more "critter proof" (when we're not using our TT). We alway bring fresh milk, fresh juice and fresh meat every time we visit.

And, both roof vents are left open approx 1 inch as well. If wondering, we have MaxxAir covers over these vents. Thus, very low risk of rain water getting inside our TT. And best of all, our TT smells nice inside - because we leave these vents open.


Hope this helps...
Spike99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 12:45 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,646
Slides are extended and fridge is turned on April 15th thru October 15th. Our electric awning goes in when we leave. Like Spike99 we leave fridge set to 'Auto' just in case the power goes out. Hint: you'll know if the power goes out because the microwave clock will be blinking. Water spigot is turned off when we leave. Our 3 roof vents have MaxxAir covers so we leave a couple and one of the crank out windows open a bit when we leave to keep air circulating.
wiscampsin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 04:56 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 30
I appreciate all the answers. So I want to leave the battery connected even though I'm always plugged in? Do you guys do anything in particular to keep the mice away while you are gone during the week?
__________________
2008 Toyota tundra 5.7l I-force V8
2009 Jayflight 26bh
jonathan28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 07:06 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 414
.

Mice and other "critters" enter into TTs, 5ers,RVs for:
- food
- shelter
- Easy access.

We put all food items into plastic or tin containers. Where possible, we use tin containers. And if we don't have an available container, we put the item inside our microwave (before leaving our site). Thus, keeping it protected from possible critters as well...

We stuff holes around our TT's slide with rags as well. If one can stick their index finger into a hole, mice can get into that hole as well.

For our TT, it has a bad mice, chipmunk and black squirrel invasion last spring. re: http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0594.jpg & http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0601.jpg & http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...e/100_0603.jpg As seen within these pictures, the factory underbelly material and fibreglass insulation of many TTs are useless. Thus, I removed its factory underbelly materials, applied steel mesh across large openings (like under the tub gooseneck and around its holding tanks) and applied contractor grade spray foam (Closed Cell @ 2 lbs - which takes water exposure). Since spray foam, NO mice or other critters has entered our TT. And having its underbelly spray foam @ 3.5" - 4.0" thick means food smells from inner floor to ground level are dramatically reduced as well.

Today, its much easier for critters to gain entry into other TTs. Thus, the TTs surrounding ours got "invaded" this spring. No one evidence of mouse droppings or other items inside our TT. Thus, "ease of access" has been eliminated within our TT as well.

Not too sure if you want to remove factory fibreglass insulation and replace with Spray Foam. Especially if your TT is under factory warranty. I do know for my next future TT, I will ensure it has Spray Foam within it as well. Contractor Grade Spray Foam (2lbs - Closed Cell) is amazing for repelling critters and for better water exposure protection....

.
Spike99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 06:17 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hebron, OH
Posts: 74
Sorry to horn in here but this is great info! Do you leave the A/C on when you're gone? We've been discussing this but don't know what's best. We will pay for our electric each month so I guess the question is how hard is it on the A/C unit? Any help will be greatly appreciated. @Wiscampsin, we ordered our surge protector and lock box today - thanks for the info and link in the other thread!
__________________
"Headed to the Lake"

Mike & Michele Arnold with Maddie Jo & Molly (Cavachons)
2011 Jayco Eagle 322 FKS
2010 F150 4 x 4 Super Crew V8 w/Max Towing Package
2011 Bennington 24 SLi Pontoon
Headed to the Lake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 07:17 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 414
For my TT's AC, I leave its AC turn OFF. It's electric hot water heater (to save on LP gas) is turned off as well. I also leave its "lights out" as well. TV/DVD player is unplugged and our coffee maker is unplugged as well. Only electrical item left on is our fridge. And if we'll be away for 3+ consecutive weeks, we "clean our fridge out", leave its door open 1/2", and turn it off as well.

Hope this helps...

.
__________________

Spike99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.