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Old 03-14-2012, 04:45 PM   #31
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OK Poohbear, I am certainly no electrician yet a fairly handy person and never hear this. What does an overhand not in the line do?
surge hits itself is the way explained to me.when there were "fuse boxes" and each wire was individual(knob & tube) they would put the knot just before the fuse so if lightning/hivoltage hit the house all they had to do was repair the wire inside the box,no attic work usually.:lightning:
The "physics" explanation I am not sure but I have had surge protectors i put before my more sophisticated ac controls we install just melt and all is well past the knot.I throw this out from time to time to some of the factory engineers and just get that "deer in headlight look".:
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:22 PM   #32
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A knot just isn't necessary anymore. Back in the old knob and tube days, electricians used to tie a knot in wire to keep the wire from pulling out of the box. Now, they either use strain relief clamps on the box or staple the Romex to the framing near the box.

Electrical joints are usually the first to fail in wiring so having a little extra length will allow repair without pulling a replacement run. If a box isn't too crowded, a little extra length can be tucked in. However, there usually isn't enough room. In those cases, a loop could be left outside the box if the box has strain relief clamps that can be loosened and tightened from inside the box.
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:54 PM   #33
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Thanks Jeannie, I'm going to toss that out in a conversation. Makes sense to me.
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Old 03-14-2012, 09:12 PM   #34
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A knot just isn't necessary anymore. Back in the old knob and tube days, electricians used to tie a knot in wire to keep the wire from pulling out of the box. Now, they either use strain relief clamps on the box or staple the Romex to the framing near the box.

Electrical joints are usually the first to fail in wiring so having a little extra length will allow repair without pulling a replacement run. If a box isn't too crowded, a little extra length can be tucked in. However, there usually isn't enough room. In those cases, a loop could be left outside the box if the box has strain relief clamps that can be loosened and tightened from inside the box.
Not the same purpose for the knot.goes after the bend to go into the fuse/breaker connection screw.all wires inside the fuse/breaker box should be neat with no slack.wire can burn into here,easy place to repair
I tie the knot on all power cords even surge protector strips mileage may very
Every power cord/cable I hookup gets a knot .,
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:52 AM   #35
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Not the same purpose for the knot.goes after the bend to go into the fuse/breaker connection screw.all wires inside the fuse/breaker box should be neat with no slack.wire can burn into here,easy place to repair
I tie the knot on all power cords even surge protector strips mileage may very
Every power cord/cable I hookup gets a knot .,
I still don't see why you think you would need a knot before going into the connection screw of a breaker. Putting the knot in #14 or #12 solid takes some serious effort and undoing it would take even more effort, not to mention the knot just looks sloppy.

I agree an electrical panel wiring should be neat but it is possible to have slack and still look neat. I always installed strain reliefs in new panels with the clamps on the inside of the box so I could leave some slack outside the box out of site behind the wallboard. If that is not possible "taking the scenic" route with the wires still allows good lead dress. If the wire should burn at the connection, rerouting to a more direct route with the wire gives you the extra length you need for the repair and still allows good lead dress. Routing the wire past the breaker and looping back to it is another way to neatly put slack inside the panel. Btw, if a connection is properly made, the chance of failure before a breaker trips is very slim. I've never had it happen to me although I've repaired one on my parent's house and fixed a couple of neighbors. All three times there wasn't enough slack for the repair so I just pigtailed the remaining wire with an extension using a Scotchlock (my preferred brand of wire nut). My repairs looked neater than the originals.

Knotting a power cord just doesn't do anything except put an unsightly lump in the cord and, depending how tight you pull the knot, could even damage it.
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:43 AM   #36
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We've been checking into what all we need to protect our investment. With all the advertising hype I've been reading for these devices it makes me wonder if we really need this protection or is it something for the after market industry to make $ on. I'm not against buying one, but just don't want to buy something that's not really needed? If the these potential electrical dangers are common at camp grounds, why aren't these surge protectors standard equipment? I have checked posts in this forum and it seems these dangers do exist. Considering calling the salesman/warranty contact person at our dealership and ask for their advice. Who do we believe?
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Old 04-14-2012, 09:10 AM   #37
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Lightning

When I worked for a utility company we had to pay an amish family a lot of money even though they had no electric in the house. Lighting had hit a power pole on their property the induced field was enough to pull their wood burning stove through the wall of their farm house.

Surge and high low protectors are great things but when it comes to lighting its a whole different world.
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Old 04-14-2012, 09:21 PM   #38
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Surge and high low protectors are great things but when it comes to lighting its a whole different world.
Absolutely!
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Old 12-29-2012, 06:47 PM   #39
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I still don't see why you think you would need a knot before going into the connection screw of a breaker. Putting the knot in #14 or #12 solid takes some serious effort and undoing it would take even more effort, not to mention the knot just looks sloppy.
.......
Knotting a power cord just doesn't do anything except put an unsightly lump in the cord and, depending how tight you pull the knot, could even damage it.
I am a Ham radio operator and at a meeting of the Lynchburg (VA) Amateur Radio Club one evening (many of the members were electrical engineers who worked at the large GE commercial radio manufacturing plant in Lynchburg), the presenter was the GE 'anti-lightning' engineer (if you will). He was advocating the benefits of 6 knots in each electrical cord and how much damage that could prevent. He gave many examples (with photos) of the benefits. He then asked the audience (mostly electrical engineers) why that trick worked. There was a long silence, then one gentleman said, "The knot is a one-turn autotransformer - it will induce a reverse current in the wire to counter the high incoming current from a lightning strike, and thereby block the surge."

The presenter also said '6' was the optimum number of knots - he found that with experimentation.

There is a very good engineering reason for the knot!

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Old 12-30-2012, 07:39 AM   #40
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This is an interesting thread, but I'm getting more confused with each post. I think protecting your electrical system is a good idea. I'm not an electrician but I do know how to tie an overhand knot. So, I'm going to do two things: 1. I'm going to contact a technical rep that's known to have a competent electrical opinion; and 2. I'm going back to the McRib thread because I had one last night.
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