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Old 11-13-2011, 05:15 PM   #11
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Make sure you dont have P rated tires they are not made for any trailer towing.
Can you provide more info regarding your statement "P ratd tires they are not for any trailer towing." I have P rated tires with a 2205 lbs max. load rating. Why would these tires not be good for trailer towing as long as I stay within the load rating of the tires?
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Old 11-13-2011, 06:22 PM   #12
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While LT tires give you a stiffer sidewall and a little better stability, there are a lot of people out there towing with P tires with few issues. That tow rating still seems a litle low to me. Is that with or without WD? Also, if you are going to re-gear the truck and keep it for a while a transmission cooler would be a good addition. That engine is going to work pretty hard and you'll probably been in the lower gears a lot.
I had a Toyota 4Runner with a V6 and no extra goodies that was rated at 5000lbs.
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Old 11-13-2011, 07:25 PM   #13
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3.73 rear and a tranny cooler looks like the best and cheapest fix. I`m using "P" tires also, I just air them up to the max (44psi) when towing and they do OK.
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Old 11-13-2011, 07:56 PM   #14
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That tow rating still seems a litle low to me. Is that with or without WD?
As far as the hitch rating is concerned you can tow up to 5,000 lbs without or 10,000 lbs with WD.

As far as the engine and drivetrain are concerned you can tow up to 4,700 lbs.

In theory I could tow the 19RD (4,100 lbs) if minimal weight is added to the trailer, with the limiting factor actually being 4,700 based on the engine and gearing rather then the limit specified with respect to not having WD.
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Old 11-14-2011, 08:50 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by 2edgesword View Post
Can you provide more info regarding your statement "P ratd tires they are not for any trailer towing." I have P rated tires with a 2205 lbs max. load rating. Why would these tires not be good for trailer towing as long as I stay within the load rating of the tires?
The side walls are to soft.... the first time you have to do an emergency maneuver you may find your tires roll right off the rims... HOW MUCH IS YOUR FAMILIES SAFETY WORTH TO YOU? Remember you not only have to factor in the weight of the trailer and tongue weight, but also anything in the truck... cargo and passengers.
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Old 11-14-2011, 10:56 AM   #16
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The side walls are to soft.... the first time you have to do an emergency maneuver you may find your tires roll right off the rims... HOW MUCH IS YOUR FAMILIES SAFETY WORTH TO YOU? Remember you not only have to factor in the weight of the trailer and tongue weight, but also anything in the truck... cargo and passengers.
I understand the various weight factors but I'm not understanding your comment that the tires are "too soft" if they have been designed to safely carry a particular load.

Of course you can always select tires that exceed the anticipated load but making that selection based on the question "how much is your families safety worth" becomes a subjective question that doesn't have a satisfactory answer if, as most of us believe, no monetary value can be assigned to our family.

This comment isn't meant to be argumentative but having worked in engineering (electronics) for the last 25 years (some of that experience has been working with engineers from the major automobile companies) I like to deal with specifications and test data rather than anecdotal evidence. If the vehicle and tire manufacturers understand that a product is going to be subject to various loads during normal and emergency use I would think those considerations would have been factored into establishing the published specifications.
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Old 11-14-2011, 11:10 AM   #17
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Another consideration with moving up to LT tires on a 1500 series truck is that the wheels may not be rated for the 60 to 80 psi with LT`s so you may have to replace all your wheels and tires, and you would get a harder ride then you are used to when not loaded. No doubt they are designed to carry more weight and would likely perform better. But since the trailer is not that big or heavy I would try the P`s first and see how they do. Upgrading to LT`s later will still be an option if you feel it is necessary after a few trial runs........
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Old 11-14-2011, 02:53 PM   #18
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I understand the various weight factors but I'm not understanding your comment that the tires are "too soft" if they have been designed to safely carry a particular load.......snip
Your correct about carrying a a particular load safely, but that is based on the TV loaded weight only...., not the additional 5,000lb to 10,000lbs being towed behind it.

The weight of the TT being towed behind the TV can influence how TV tires react under certain towing conditions (TV turns, sudden stops, cross winds, passing vehicles, sway event, etc.). Having additional plys in the tire sidewall reduces sidewall "give", thus providing added TV handling characteristics when towing. Most "P" rated tires have only a 2-4ply sidewall, where "LT" tires commonly have 8-10 ply sidewalls. The "P" rated tires will give you a softer and adequate ride performance, which is fine for 95% of the Trucks and SUV's which never tow a TT.

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Old 11-14-2011, 03:03 PM   #19
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You upgrade one thing,that stresses another,upgrade that & now you need this.A good used truck with heavier motor/tow capacity might end up cheaper than all the upgrades this could involve.
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Old 11-14-2011, 03:57 PM   #20
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Your correct about carrying a a particular load safely, but that is based on the TV loaded weight only...., not the additional 5,000lb to 10,000lbs being towed behind it.
First, I have zero insight into how the major automakers establish their published specifications.

On the other hand, since they do publish towing specifications, I have to believe that some consideration and testing went into establishing the specifications they publish, especially given our litigious society. How do you publish a maximum allowable trailer tow weight without testing and data on how towing a trailer of that weight will impact the drivetrain, chassis and tires of the TV, and more importantly, safety of the vehicle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustic Eagle View Post
Having additional plys in the tire sidewall reduces sidewall "give", thus providing added TV handling characteristics when towing. Most "P" rated tires have only a 2-4ply sidewall, where "LT" tires commonly have 8-10 ply sidewalls. The "P" rated tires will give you a softer and adequate ride performance, which is fine for 95% of the Trucks and SUV's which never tow a TT.
Understood.

And I'm also not saying that the auto companies don't make mistakes or that they are beyond reproach. I am one of the Toyota owners subject to the brake, floormat recalled .
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