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Old 01-12-2018, 09:54 AM   #11
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Heat pumps work optimally in outside temps above 40. Think of a camper as a bridge. What signs are on a bridge? Bridge ices before road. Why is this? Because the air circulates under the bridge,,,like it will for your camper. If you're going to stay put for awhile it would be advisable to skirt your camper. Maybe skirt it with the same material Jayco uses for insulation...Astrofoil. Basically it's bubble wrap with silver foil on both sides.
Hope this helps...
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:07 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by sbarlag View Post
Heat pumps work optimally in outside temps above 40. Think of a camper as a bridge. What signs are on a bridge? Bridge ices before road. Why is this? Because the air circulates under the bridge,,,like it will for your camper. If you're going to stay put for awhile it would be advisable to skirt your camper. Maybe skirt it with the same material Jayco uses for insulation...Astrofoil. Basically it's bubble wrap with silver foil on both sides.
Hope this helps...
Great analogy comparing the open area below the RV to a bridge!

We'll be in the RV for 3 to 4 weeks. Living in West Texas (wind capitol of the U.S.), I don't think the Astrofoil would hold up to the task.

Our temperatures this time of the year are all over the place, so the 40/17 degrees I mentioned are the extremes for the 10 day forecast. It's supposed to be 69 degrees (low of 41) next Friday.

Sounds like I'll need to crank up the propane furnace when temperatures plunge overnight.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:22 AM   #13
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The skirting idea sbarlag suggested is a good idea.

Since you're in a windy environment, another option could be to make a skirt out of plywood / OSB board and the Blue Insulation Board.

Once you have the skirting on, you could run some lights under that trailer, that may help keep the under trailer and underbelly warm and from freezing.

As other's have mentioned you could also run an electric heater in the basement of your trailer, open up the access panels to the underbelly to allow heat to flow in there.

Just some more food for thought.
Good luck.
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Old 01-12-2018, 12:10 PM   #14
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ADDITIONAL PROPANE RELATED INFO:

A burner or appliance rated at 60,000 BTU/hr (with burner turned on to "High") will burn 60,000 BTU every hour which means consumption of fuel is one gallon of propane every 1.53 hours. (92,000 BTU/Hr / 60,000 BTU/Hr = 1.53 hours that one gallon would last Providing the burner remains on "high" you can determine the number of hours your propane supply with last. To adjust for appliances, like a furnace, that are controlled by a thermostat and only cycle "ON" maybe a few minutes per hour, you would then need to adjust your calculations. For example if the furnace cycled on for 15 minutes every hour in the winter you would adjust by a factor of 4. (92,000 BTU/Hr / 60,000 BTU/Hr = 1.53 hours that one gallon would last x 4 = 6.12 hours of furnace use for each gallon in inventory)

Hope this helps...by the way...I'm not smart enough to have come up with this, I copied it from another source...
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:32 PM   #15
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Hay bales make great insulation when skirting, if available.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:02 PM   #16
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If you’re heating the house and have water there, just winterize the RV then you don’t have to worry about it.
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Old 01-14-2018, 08:45 PM   #17
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My buddy uses his camper for dear hunting. if you don't use your furnes it will freeze your holding tanks he has froze them using other heaters in side. jaykos are rated to 0 if you use your furnace
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Old 01-17-2018, 09:25 PM   #18
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I've used my RV late into the season in Canada and well into freezing temperatures. Skirting is important. If electric heat is cheap, put a space heater under the RV and make the skirting as close to airtight as you can.

There are lots of good and simple ideas on youtube. My first time trying to do "should be good enough" to push a week into freezing temperatures really wasn't as good as I would have hoped. Water feed line froze. Inlet froze (and broke). Dump valves froze. Holding tanks froze. Without good planning it was a major pain. The next time around I may have gone a bit overboard but a weekend of prep made everything work without any hiccups.
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:39 PM   #19
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My advice: do not go cheap and not run the furnace! I did that and now am chasing a leak from a frozen pipe. I would gladly pay the propane bill tonot have to do this!!!
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Old 01-20-2018, 06:46 AM   #20
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So, as stated above, your furnace heats under the trailer to keep tanks and water lines from freezing. If you don't run the furnace very much you run the risk of frozen pipes (right now, after a 28F night my water hose is frozen, inside pipes are fine).

I do use an electric heater to supplement the furnace, but, it is sized such that the furnace comes on regularly.

Heat pumps are almost useless when temps get much below freezing. And, no, they are not ducted to the belly. No reason to since at temps where you need heat to the belly they don't work very well. Turn on the furnace.

Good skirting will save you a ton of propane cost during the winter. If you are going to be stationary do it. I'd do as suggested and get a small electric heater for under there as well. The oil radiator type if possible, or an IR heat lamp controlled with a thermostat. Our trailer has rubber propane lines under the trailer so I would not want an open heating element under there.
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