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Old 03-06-2018, 06:28 AM   #1
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Equalizer foot

So somewhere along the miles I bent my one of my Equalizer's base plates. The end is bent up about 1 to 1.5 inches. My thinking is I will not be able to flatten it out with a sledge and I don't think I want to be taking a torch to it.

Is replacing the base plate a difficult job and since it's working should I even bother?

What got me looking at it was I read about Snap Pads and thought "I NEED those". 😂. Do I need Snap Pads? They look very cool but I don't think they will work with my broken foot.
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Old 03-06-2018, 07:27 AM   #2
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Looks like you can buy a replacement pad and bolt for about $35. Looks to be a simple replacement (dealer replaced one of mine). I would NOT beat on it with a sledge with it still attached to the ram shaft.
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:21 AM   #3
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The bolt is a large allen head. Approx 1/4 Allen wrench. I would unscrew it and take it to a shop with a press. Have them straighten it and they could then add some additional size or strengthen it with some more metal. Or just order and replace.

I too just noticed one of mine is bent and will let you know how I correct.


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Old 03-06-2018, 02:07 PM   #4
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I spoke to the Randy, the tech at Equalizer. He said to use a 1/4 inch Allan with an impact wrench to remove the pad. The replacement part number is "7849", "10x10 foot pad and bolt". Also said to use blue lock tight when installing.

On the Equalizer site it is $52.52 with $17 shipping but on RVupgrades.com it is $35 plus about $9 shipping. So for about $45 I can get a brand new pad.

Also, what are your thoughts on Snap Pads (RVSnappads.com)? They will have one available for Equalizer later this month. Seems like a good idea.
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Old 03-06-2018, 02:27 PM   #5
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Also, what are your thoughts on Snap Pads (RVSnappads.com)? They will have one available for Equalizer later this month. Seems like a good idea.
Just looked at them. Guess they would be a good upgrade if they don't eat up too much clearance. I would have little use for them though as I always use 2x8's and more under mine for better stabilization and quicker ram stroke time.
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:09 PM   #6
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Airliner creep

Someone, and I am pretty sure it was Rob, made an excellent observation here once regarding the jacks and the fact that they get lateral forces applied to them as air leaks (or is released) from the chassis while they are deployed (the airliner creep). It had been suggested that if the jacks are retracted with this lateral force, it could stress the hydraulic rams. However, he made a case that by using plastic pads under the jack, this allowed them to slip just enough to keep the rams safe. Maybe I just made that up after 12 hours of driving, crossing another time zone, and breathing diesel fumes, but this made sense to me when it was brought up a long time ago. This is the reason I use plastic pads under my jacks.
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:12 PM   #7
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That makes sense that the ability to slide could protect the rams.
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:21 PM   #8
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Mark, what advantages did you see in adding the snap pads? Maybe they will let the jacks slide a bit too. I can’t blame you for wanting a permanent option so as not to have to get on the muddy ground and place plastic pads under your jacks. I just experienced that Saturday.
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGintys924 View Post
Someone, and I am pretty sure it was Rob, made an excellent observation here once regarding the jacks and the fact that they get lateral forces applied to them as air leaks (or is released) from the chassis while they are deployed (the airliner creep). It had been suggested that if the jacks are retracted with this lateral force, it could stress the hydraulic rams. However, he made a case that by using plastic pads under the jack, this allowed them to slip just enough to keep the rams safe. Maybe I just made that up after 12 hours of driving, crossing another time zone, and breathing diesel fumes, but this made sense to me when it was brought up a long time ago. This is the reason I use plastic pads under my jacks.
You are correct, and it was confirmed by Bigfoot when I spoke to them directly. They said an air dump system helps reduce what has been named "Airliner creep", referring of course to our Freightliner Airliner rear suspension. They also confirmed that having pads that will allow for some slippage is a good idea to help from laterally over-stressing the cylinders. Another thing Bigfoot told me is that Jayco "should" have installed larger cylinders on our Senecas to better withstand creep.

Below are pictures of my pads as well as the box I build to store them. The pads are from Bigfoot, but not the RV leveler company!

I wonder if since Jayco moved away from Bigfoot if the cylinders are larger?
Attached Thumbnails
Jack pad storage 2.jpg   15x15x1.5-OrangeGlossy_0039-copy1.jpg  
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Old 03-06-2018, 08:52 PM   #10
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I knew it!

I knew I remembered you mentioning this Rob!
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Old 03-07-2018, 09:41 AM   #11
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Equalizer foot

The owner's manual reminds us to fill the air tanks before retracting the jacks. This helps minimize creep strain when breaking camp. The manual also instructs to have the transmission in neutral before deploying the jacks for the same reason I suppose.


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Old 07-01-2022, 09:17 PM   #12
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Lost an EQ Systems leveling pad. Much damage

I just lost a front leveling foot off my 2016 Entrega Anthem 44b and it caused all kinds of damage to my Motor Home and tow car, even cut a hole in my sterling tow bar. I ended up with a damaged mud flap, front end damage, and a hole in the oil pan of my tow car. Total damage approximately $15,000.

There was no trace of Loctite on my threads and no damage to the hydraulic ram. Looks like the bolt that holds the leveling foot simply unscrewed. I bought a new foot and bolt kit from EQ and could screw in the new bolt by hand.

I contacted EQ Systems, Jasen Loose. He texted me that they have had no problems with these coming off. After reading this post it appears that he is lying or just hasn't had complaints.
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