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Old 06-17-2011, 02:32 PM   #21
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Howdy -

I have a Jayco 32BHDS that has a dry weight of 8,300lbs (weighed at the factory). I do not yet know the loaded weight, but I would suspect it is in the 9,300-9,500lb range (GVWR is 10klbs). I plan on stopping by the scale one our next trip (next month).

I am currently running a 1,200lb Reese Straight Line hitch and have been wondering lately if this is big enough. If my trailer weighed ~8klbs from the factory, the tongue weight was already pushing 1,200lbs. Now that I've loaded it up (storage in the front is FULL), my tongue weight is probably quite a bit higher than the 1,200lb rating of the hitch.

I really started to think about this after the last trip, when I realized that one of my snap up brackets was bent. No idea how it happened as there is not any binding on my hitch, but it did (not sure how too much weight would be a factor either, as that piece of equipment is the same on most all hitches). The hitch was used when I bought it, so that may have played a factor in the failure.

Anyhow, I'm just wondering who out there is running a 1,500lb WDH, and how big your trailers are. Did you convert from a smaller hitch, or did you start out big? I'm looking at converting, and from what I can tell, I would only need to buy new bars and a new shank. I can't find any ratings on the trunnion head, but etrailer.com only sells one, regardless of the weight rating your going to use. Same goes for the cams on the DC system.

Let me know what you guys think. Before I get flamed for not knowing my weight, let me remind you that I'm going to the scale on my next trip, before I make any changes (other than getting new, heavy duty snap up brackets).
My trailer weighs about the same as yours. Equalizer recomended a 1400 lb hitch, so that's what I did. Works fine.

Tom
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Old 06-17-2011, 03:17 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Rustic Eagle View Post

Using self tappers can be effective on the heavier TT tubular frames, but the lighter frames one may loose adequate thread contact.

Bob
Would you consider the Jayco frame to be heavier or lighter? The frame under the trailer seems pretty heavy duty to me, but I'm not sure about the A Frame.
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Old 06-17-2011, 03:37 PM   #23
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Would you consider the Jayco frame to be heavier or lighter? The frame under the trailer seems pretty heavy duty to me, but I'm not sure about the A Frame.
I really don't know how much tension gets placed on the side bolts (they may be there mostly to prevent side shifting) so it's possible self tappers may be strong enough. However, the threads made in a frame by self tapping screws will never be as strong as a nut unless the wall of the frame is as thick and hard as the nut.

Tube frames that are the same strength as a channel or I-beam frame can have thinner walls so I'm guessing the walls of the tube on the tongue A-frame is going to be thinner than the web or flanges of the I-beam on the main frame. Even if the tube walls are as thick as the web of the main frame I-beam, that's not a lot of meat for the screw to bite into. Again, it would depend on how much tension gets put on those bolts.

Another concern, should you decide to use the self tappers, is that top clamp screw. If you just tighten it against the opposite wall of the tube, the tube would most likely distort and allow the screw to loosen. I would drill a clearance in the tube wall so the clamp screw can pass through and bear on the tube wall alongside the bracket. That way, the tube wall will be sandwiched between the screw tip and the bracket without worries of distorting the tube.
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Old 06-17-2011, 04:09 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by TexasA&M View Post
Would you consider the Jayco frame to be heavier or lighter? The frame under the trailer seems pretty heavy duty to me, but I'm not sure about the A Frame.
I added my backer plate over five years ago and I did consult Reese before incorporating it. When I installed my Dual Cam (I used the self tappers) five years ago I also contacted Jayco to confirm the wall thickness on the tube frame on my 2005 Eagle, because I was curious about the amount of thread contact with my 1,200lb spring bar rating. Still looking for the old reference data, but I do know that the tubular frame thickness used on my Eagle would be considered a "heavy gauge" compared to the lite TT A-frames, and I would assume that your model Jayco wouldn't be anything less than mine.

I do recall a prior discussion on another forum a while back on the size of the Reese Dual Cam self tapper threads and the gauge of a similar TT tube wall thickness as mine, and the conclusion was that it was acceptable but not ideal.

Bob
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Old 06-17-2011, 04:50 PM   #25
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For what its worth, when it comes to self-tappers I believe that a thread-forming screw (type AB) has a higher resistance to back-out than a thread-cutting screw.

Bob
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Old 06-17-2011, 05:16 PM   #26
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For what its worth, when it comes to self-tappers I believe that a thread-forming screw (type AB) has a higher resistance to back-out than a thread-cutting screw.

Bob
Probably true since thread forming screws work by displacing metal rather than cutting it. Loctite should take care of any concerns for backout. My chief worry would be for the threads stripping.

After looking where the stresses occur, it seems the purpose of the screws are to prevent lateral movement and tension would be minimal so self tappers should be adequate. It certainly would be less work. I would still drill a clearance hole for the top clamp screw so it would bear against the tube wall closest to the bracket. That way there would be no frame distortion.
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Old 06-17-2011, 05:46 PM   #27
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How can you tell the difference between the two styles of self tapping bolts?
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Old 06-17-2011, 07:41 PM   #28
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The thread cutting type has a notch cut in the end to give it a cutting edge and a place for the chips that are cut away to exit. The thread forming type just have threads that start to taper at the end.
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Old 06-17-2011, 08:15 PM   #29
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Great ideas being exchanged, which of course gets me thinking............,

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snip......After looking where the stresses occur, it seems the purpose of the screws are to prevent lateral movement and tension would be minimal so self tappers should be adequate.
I tend to agree when using the Reese Dual Cam/WDH (no for/aft chain movement in TV turns), but I believe the screws may incur "some" load (vertical or otherwise, possibly minimal as well) keeping the bracket from pulling itself over the top of the frame with the heavier spring bars (1,200lbs plus), essentially that's what happening without the screws.

In the case of a standard WDH I would think the lateral forces against the screws (and the bracket saddle over the top of the frame) would be far greater than a Dual Cam application under the same 1,200lb (plus) spring bar load conditions because of the for/aft chain movement during a TV turn.


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snip......I would still drill a clearance hole for the top clamp screw so it would bear against the tube wall closest to the bracket. That way there would be no frame distortion.
Wouldn't you actually loose stability of the snap-up bracket saddle over the top of the frame by having the clamp screw contact point further away from its point of attachment (threaded area) on the snap-up bracket considering there is only a 1/4 turn of tightening?

To eliminate the possibility of distortion a 2" wide x 6" tall (height of tube frame) backer plate (tack welded to frame) between the tube frame and clamp screw could be easily incorporated. The backer plate I utilized captured the clamp screw as well.

Just thinking out loud here.

Bob
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Old 06-17-2011, 08:19 PM   #30
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How can you tell the difference between the two styles of self tapping bolts?
Adding to Jeannie's comments, if you go to a store that sells fasteners they will be identified as "Thread-Forming Screws", and they should also state the Type (A, B, AB, etc.).

Bob
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