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Old 11-07-2013, 08:24 PM   #41
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snip....... So is there an acceptable range?.......snip
Not all vehicle suspensions are created equal, so there isn't a general "acceptable range". A given vehicle's steering, handling, and braking integrity is based on specific suspension adjustments/weights/tolerances in an "unhitched" state.

The majority of vehicle manufactures require that the front suspension be returned to it's "unhitched" height (or weight) when utilizing a WDH (no plus/minus range specified). Recently only GM and Ford with some new model full size trucks have specified a front suspension "height range" when a WDH is utlized..............,

But......., in your case a WDH isn't being utilized. IMO if you find that the tongue weight placed on your Odyessy's receiver raises the front of the vehicle from it's "unhitched" height, plus you know that the TT's tongue weight is within the Odyessy's specified 350lb maximum tongue weight limit....., I would advise you to contact the vehicle manufacture to confirm (do to safety implications) if there is an acceptable front suspension "height range" (or front suspension weight reduction range) under these "hitched" conditions.

Bob
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:43 AM   #42
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Even if it "looks right" as the dealer claims, you will know if its too much because your steering will feel "loose" for lack of a better term. In other words you will know you have less control.
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:48 PM   #43
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I would not tow mine if I didn't have the WDH.

You might want to also consider some Air Lift bags to raise up the back end. I've just installed those as well. Even filling the van up on its own without a trailer causes the nose to point in the air without the Air Lift bags.

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Old 11-08-2013, 07:13 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustic Eagle View Post
Not all vehicle suspensions are created equal, so there isn't a general "acceptable range". A given vehicle's steering, handling, and braking integrity is based on specific suspension adjustments/weights/tolerances in an "unhitched" state.

The majority of vehicle manufactures require that the front suspension be returned to it's "unhitched" height (or weight) when utilizing a WDH (no plus/minus range specified). Recently only GM and Ford with some new model full size trucks have specified a front suspension "height range" when a WDH is utlized..............,

But......., in your case a WDH isn't being utilized. IMO if you find that the tongue weight placed on your Odyessy's receiver raises the front of the vehicle from it's "unhitched" height, plus you know that the TT's tongue weight is within the Odyessy's specified 350lb maximum tongue weight limit....., I would advise you to contact the vehicle manufacture to confirm (do to safety implications) if there is an acceptable front suspension "height range" (or front suspension weight reduction range) under these "hitched" conditions.

Bob
I just got off the phone with Honda Customer Service and asked about the squat in the rear and lift in the front. He said there was no specification for this. He just reiterated the tongue, and gross rear axle weight rating and "implied" that there is no need for concern if I stay under these two ratings.

Perhaps there is no specification for the amount of squat because they know it's acceptable when staying within the toungue and gross rear axle rating?
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Old 02-11-2014, 07:50 PM   #45
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I know I am responding to an older thread, however, I want to add what I just read in my owners manual for the 2007 Odyssey with tow package:

Weight Distribution Hitch required over 1,850 LBS.
Sway Control recommended for over 2,000 LBS

see copy of owners manual.Click image for larger version

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Old 02-11-2014, 11:08 PM   #46
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In the old day and first learning, I used to tow a smaller size TT with a mini-van. Like many, I "beefed up" its rear suspension with Timbren SES units, bought/used WDH System (with properly sized bars), installed ATF cooler for 5,000 lbs trailer and installed better / HD shocks as well. Both Tow Vehicle and Trailer were at their max weight numbers. re: 3,500 lbs trailer. Calculator said it was ok. RV Sales Guy said it was ok. Thus, I talked myself thinking this was ok as well. Approx. 1.5 years later, I'm driving my van (no trailer connected) and while pulled away from a stop light, I hear a sudden Bang. Lost 2nd gear and reverse gear. Yes, blown transmission. Limped my van to my tranny specialist and after tearing it apart, he told me I was pulling something too heavy weight. re: All internal bushing and gaskets were over stressed / squashed. After double checking my numbers, I realized that I forgot to include the most important number. re: The wind resistance factory number. Sometimes, wind can create drag that feels 500-700 lbs heavier trailer. When adding numbers, do remember the wind drag influence number as well. I learned the hard way. Today, I use an over sized Tow Vehicle. Thus, no more "over stressing" my Tow Vehicle.

Long mumblings short... It's best to use a Tow Vehicle rated to pull 5,000 lbs trailer to pull a 3,500 lbs trailer. I learned the hard way....
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Old 02-12-2014, 12:06 AM   #47
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Spike99 I have to agree with you. We managed ok with our Journey for our first season with the new trailer but I noticed soot on the bumper at the campground on our last weekend out. The DW also agreed that the Journey didn't seem to be running as well as it was before the trailer so we traded in for a Ram and it feels so much better towing.

But sometimes you have to make due with the tools you have. Just be safe and happy!
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:55 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike99 View Post
In the old day and first learning, I used to tow a smaller size TT with a mini-van. Like many, I "beefed up" its rear suspension with Timbren SES units, bought/used WDH System (with properly sized bars), installed ATF cooler for 5,000 lbs trailer and installed better / HD shocks as well. Both Tow Vehicle and Trailer were at their max weight numbers. re: 3,500 lbs trailer. Calculator said it was ok. RV Sales Guy said it was ok. Thus, I talked myself thinking this was ok as well. Approx. 1.5 years later, I'm driving my van (no trailer connected) and while pulled away from a stop light, I hear a sudden Bang. Lost 2nd gear and reverse gear. Yes, blown transmission. Limped my van to my tranny specialist and after tearing it apart, he told me I was pulling something too heavy weight. re: All internal bushing and gaskets were over stressed / squashed. After double checking my numbers, I realized that I forgot to include the most important number. re: The wind resistance factory number. Sometimes, wind can create drag that feels 500-700 lbs heavier trailer. When adding numbers, do remember the wind drag influence number as well. I learned the hard way. Today, I use an over sized Tow Vehicle. Thus, no more "over stressing" my Tow Vehicle.

Long mumblings short... It's best to use a Tow Vehicle rated to pull 5,000 lbs trailer to pull a 3,500 lbs trailer. I learned the hard way....
Sounds just like what happened with my Ford Explorer twice! Except I never towed a thing with it lol. The guys over at the airstream forums are doing some serious miles on the latest generation vans towing way beyond capacity. There will be plenty of positive and negative stories on both sides, but I choose to play it safe and stay within manufacturer ratings. I do agree that going with a higher rating TV will make the towing experience more enjoyable, but I've been pretty darn impressed with the performance so far. Now of course, I probably just jinxed myself and my tranny will blow on our next trip, but you guys here will be the first to know.
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