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Old 01-15-2015, 10:32 AM   #21
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And that is if you have 120v. When the voltage is lower in a cold cg with lots of heaters going, the current load will be even higher.
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:54 PM   #22
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When I had a 5Ver, I was able to install an extra wall plug,in the wall, and ran a cord out to the door, where my 30amp came in. Had a mail end installed.
Just ran an extension cord along side the 30 amp and plugged it in.
I could then run 1 or even 2 electric units, by using the added wall plug and the standard wall plug. I also used a nice heavy extension cord, 16 ga. I believe.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:19 PM   #23
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I'm curious, why run an electric heater when you have a furnace? A resistive heater is a huge draw on the system.
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:58 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by KGirdley View Post
I'm curious, why run an electric heater when you have a furnace? A resistive heater is a huge draw on the system.
#1-My heater is oil filled and I like it because it's quiet.
#2- I don't carry propane tanks ( that's the real answer)
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:07 AM   #25
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If you are just staying for a few nights, and the electric is included in the daily price, then the electric heater saves Propane.
As Truce say's, it is quieter. But if you are staying for a week or more, and paying .15 to .20 a KW for electricity, you might not want to do it.
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Old 01-26-2015, 08:33 PM   #26
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No 20 amp available. Just a 30 amp. And yes, electricity included and much quieter running a plug in heater. Three more questions PLEASE

1) When plugged in, does ANYTHNG run purely off battery power still or only electric converted to 12 volt. Wondering after reading if I am overcharging my batteries by not using them for anything.

2) With 2 Honda 2000 watt generators going. And by the math I learned here, 30 amps x 120 or 115 or 110 (still confused about which it is, it seems to vary in google) is 3600 watts, does the extra 400 watts go anywhere in helping me to run the plug in heaters, or no because the breakers and wring are still going to pop regardless of how much juice I have coming in over 3600 watts / 30 amps? If 30 amps is 3600 watts and I have 4000 watts, is the extra watts lost?

3) Assuming at LEAST I can plug and extension cord into one of the Hondas 120 outlet in addition to the 30 amp plug and get it that way?

Thanks everyone
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:22 AM   #27
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No one? Did I stump the crowd?
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:50 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Cheaperrooter View Post
No 20 amp available. Just a 30 amp. And yes, electricity included and much quieter running a plug in heater. Three more questions PLEASE

1) When plugged in, does ANYTHNG run purely off battery power still or only electric converted to 12 volt. Wondering after reading if I am overcharging my batteries by not using them for anything.

2) With 2 Honda 2000 watt generators going. And by the math I learned here, 30 amps x 120 or 115 or 110 (still confused about which it is, it seems to vary in google) is 3600 watts, does the extra 400 watts go anywhere in helping me to run the plug in heaters, or no because the breakers and wring are still going to pop regardless of how much juice I have coming in over 3600 watts / 30 amps? If 30 amps is 3600 watts and I have 4000 watts, is the extra watts lost?

3) Assuming at LEAST I can plug and extension cord into one of the Hondas 120 outlet in addition to the 30 amp plug and get it that way?

Thanks everyone
Batteries are wired parallel to load. Anything (load)connected to circuirt is also wired parallel. Draw is constant with respect to load. In a charging system for example, batteries stabilize voltage, and provide reserve current (wattage) availability beyond alternator output but withing the capacity of a battery before voltage drops off.
2. Most generators sold are listed at maximum output not sustained (rated) output. You didn't loose anything. That difference should be considered a power factor that relates to inductive or motor starting current. Small motors small power factor, large motors large power factor. V x A= W. V x A X Pf = Max wattage!
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:56 AM   #29
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Ummmm yeah. Could you dumb that down? That was WAY too technical and really, didn't answer my questions still couldn't find an answer in there anywhere to say if when plugged in, are the batteries being used? I would say no. They are not, because the electric is being converted to supply the things the batteries would supply without electricity. So they are dormant.

And can I plug into the extra outlet on generator to supply one of the heater fans in addition to the 30 amp generaors plug to stop breaker from throwing inside unit.
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Old 01-29-2015, 12:43 PM   #30
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Batteries are not typically used when connected to shore power. I would think you could plug into the generator, but the total would only be the total power output of the generator. You may a voltage drop if you try to draw more power than it can produce. And the power is rated at 120 volts but can vary from 110 to about 122 without much chance of damage. I keep a voltage meter plugged into one of my outlets so I know what is happening. On hot days, with everyone's A/C running, and a full campground the voltage may drop, especially in remote areas. Then what happens is motors etc still need the same amount of watts to operate, so when voltage drops amperage goes up and you may blow the circuit.

To compare electric to water to make it easier to understand
Amperage is flow rate
Watt is gallons
Voltage is pressure

If you need more gallons, you can increase pressure, or increase flow (amperage.)
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