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Old 03-24-2016, 06:57 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by havnfun View Post
Thanks. So where do you get the "high quality plug", and what's it called?
I need some in my tool box for sure but hope I never have to use it. lol
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It's been a couple decades or so since I've plugged a tire (I'm just too old to do it now). I haven't had a flat in well over a decade. You would have to experiment to find a good quality plug. Avoid the plugs that look like they were cut from sheets of rubber; they will have a square or rectangular shape. String plugs that look like thick cotton cords soaked in liquid rubber are also to be avoided. The ones I found to work best look a bit like a long, really skinny turd with a few strands of what looks like fishing line embedded in the plug to reinforce the plug. Camel was a good brand back then.

You have to thoroughly ream out the puncture with a rubber cement covered rasp designed for that purpose. Frequently add more cement to the tool while reaming. Leave the rasp in the tire to make finding the puncture again. Insert a plug into the insertion tool's eye (avoid the tools that don't have a closed eye. Slather the plug and insertion tool's shank with rubber cement just before inserting the plug into the puncture. Quickly push the plug/tool into the puncture until only around a quarter inch is still showing outside the tire. Just as quickly pull the insertion tool back out enough to allow cutting the plug off of the tool. You have to work quickly to avoid the cement setting up and losing its ability to lubricate the plug and tool, then seal the installed plug. You will now have four strands of plug inside the hole. The two loops that will be inside the tire help to keep the plug from working its way out of the tire when you first reinflate it before the cement has fully set. Do not trim the plug flush with the outside surface of the tire to avoid having it work its way into the tire before the cement can fully set; the protruding plug will quickly wear off.

You can reinflate a tire and drive on it as soon as you finish plugging it although it's a good idea to avoid doing so for an hour or two if possible.
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Old 03-24-2016, 07:02 AM   #22
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Plugs can cause belt separation. That is why the big tire chains do not plug tires.

Only use plugs in an emergency situation.
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Old 03-24-2016, 08:10 AM   #23
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One of my local tire shops has a plug patch. They dismount the tire and push it through from the inside. I patches the hole and fills it with the plug part. I have one in my truck tire, been there for 30,000 miles. No leak.
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Old 03-24-2016, 09:18 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Fairenatic View Post
Plugs can cause belt separation. That is why the big tire chains do not plug tires.

Only use plugs in an emergency situation.
While I agree that using an inside patch is the best way to repair a puncture, I have yet to see proof that plugs cause belt separation. I have always used plugs to repair my own and have done so probably a couple of dozen times in the last 35 years or so. Put many miles on after plugging, never once has a belt separated or the plug failed. I typically run my tires until they are close to the wear bars.

If using a plug causes belt separation then I submit that the person putting the plug in did something improperly.
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Old 04-04-2016, 07:54 PM   #25
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Proper repair methods

Tires properly should be both plugged and patched. The plugging portion seals from water extrusion into the steel belts. Water causes rusting of the belts which leads to breaking of belt strands and separation of tire. The patch properly seals the inner liner preventing slow air loss . Plugging from the outside, though quick and easy, doesn't allow an internal inspection. Tire sidewalls are easily broken down from the deflection of running low, also a penetrating object can protrude and damage a sidewall. Worst case scenario is an explosion upon applying air from internally damage.
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Old 04-04-2016, 08:03 PM   #26
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While I agree that using an inside patch is the best way to repair a puncture, I have yet to see proof that plugs cause belt separation. I have always used plugs to repair my own and have done so probably a couple of dozen times in the last 35 years or so. Put many miles on after plugging, never once has a belt separated or the plug failed. I typically run my tires until they are close to the wear bars.

If using a plug causes belt separation then I submit that the person putting the plug in did something improperly.
Your personal experience does not reflect the national standard set by tire retailers. If it were a safe way to repair a tire, they would all be doing it. It is far less labor intensive and would save them untold amounts of money in labor to plug tires.
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King Bed with Java Interior, (2X) Yamaha EF2000isV2
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Old 04-04-2016, 08:44 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by rosuzq View Post
Tires properly should be both plugged and patched. The plugging portion seals from water extrusion into the steel belts. Water causes rusting of the belts which leads to breaking of belt strands and separation of tire. The patch properly seals the inner liner preventing slow air loss . Plugging from the outside, though quick and easy, doesn't allow an internal inspection. Tire sidewalls are easily broken down from the deflection of running low, also a penetrating object can protrude and damage a sidewall. Worst case scenario is an explosion upon applying air from internally damage.
Welcome to the forum.
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