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Old 10-10-2014, 02:43 PM   #31
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I may be at max and most 1/2 ton guys are as well but I do not think that means we are "beating" on anything. With proper driving and maintenance my vehicle will last as long as any other with no repairs.

we had all kinds of 3/4 tons and 1 tons in our shop getting repairs...
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:08 PM   #32
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There is no such 80 percent rule. I have worked in the auto industry my whole life and no automotive engineer that I know of ever said 80 percent was max
To me, the issue is not whether any engineer ever said it, but that it works out to be common sense given that you will probably load both your TV and your TT to come pretty close to the max. that is published by the mfg. of the TT given the 80% guideline (note I don't say absolute RULE!).
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Old 10-10-2014, 04:03 PM   #33
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The 80% deal is an unwritten "rule" that to my understanding was more or less created by RV`ers. It is a simple equation where you only tow a trailer that is 80% of your vehicles tow rating, leaving the other 20% for passengers, cargo in the vehicle and any other variables that may arise. It is by no means absolute but a general guideline to allow some margin for error. It does not however address the issue of payload, which may still be exceeded in some vehicles when considering the tongue weight of the trailer, passengers and gear in the truck. In some cases the payload or lack thereof can be more of a concern in the 1/2 tons then the tow rating of the truck.
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Old 10-10-2014, 04:44 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by docmarrin View Post
To me, the issue is not whether any engineer ever said it, but that it works out to be common sense given that you will probably load both your TV and your TT to come pretty close to the max. that is published by the mfg. of the TT given the 80% guideline (note I don't say absolute RULE!).
Common sense were the two key words in your post. It seems to be in rather short supply at times.
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Old 10-10-2014, 05:22 PM   #35
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"Half ton towable" is mostly a sales gimmick. Half ton trucks don't have any business hauling more than 5000-6000 pounds. There's simply not enough chassis there to do it.
If you are towing 100% of the time, this is probably true. I would venture a guess that most people towing with 1/2 ton trucks probably tow less than 3000 miles per year, or less than 25% of the time. Modern half tons with the appropriate gearing and engine, using appropriate WDH and trailers with brakes will do fine up to around 8000 or so lbs. Just like anything else, you need the proper gear and a competent driver. An idiot pulling 1000 lbs behind a 1 ton can cause a lot more carnage than an experienced driver with an overweight truck...

People get all bent out of shape with a 7200 lbs GVWR truck pulling a 8000 lbs trailer. They talk about the "tail wagging the dog" and speculate on what will happen if the trailer brakes fail.

Ironically, these are the same people usually towing a 12,000 lbs trailer with a 8800 lbs GVWR truck. Somehow a trailer that weighs 800 lbs more than the truck is too much... but a trailer that is 3200 lbs more is ok. The half ton trucks brakes are going to fail if the 8000 lbs trailer brakes fail... but the 3/4 or 1 ton trucks will be able to stop the 12,000 lbs trailer.

That doesn't make sense to me.

Short of towing with a HDT, if your trailer brakes fail you are out of luck if you are headed downhill. The brakes on the 3/4 ton truck might last for another couple hundred feet... but they won't stop 20,000 lbs of weight moving downhill. Its just not going to happen.
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:17 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by spoon059 View Post
If you are towing 100% of the time, this is probably true. I would venture a guess that most people towing with 1/2 ton trucks probably tow less than 3000 miles per year, or less than 25% of the time. Modern half tons with the appropriate gearing and engine, using appropriate WDH and trailers with brakes will do fine up to around 8000 or so lbs. Just like anything else, you need the proper gear and a competent driver. An idiot pulling 1000 lbs behind a 1 ton can cause a lot more carnage than an experienced driver with an overweight truck...

People get all bent out of shape with a 7200 lbs GVWR truck pulling a 8000 lbs trailer. They talk about the "tail wagging the dog" and speculate on what will happen if the trailer brakes fail.

Ironically, these are the same people usually towing a 12,000 lbs trailer with a 8800 lbs GVWR truck. Somehow a trailer that weighs 800 lbs more than the truck is too much... but a trailer that is 3200 lbs more is ok. The half ton trucks brakes are going to fail if the 8000 lbs trailer brakes fail... but the 3/4 or 1 ton trucks will be able to stop the 12,000 lbs trailer.

That doesn't make sense to me.

Short of towing with a HDT, if your trailer brakes fail you are out of luck if you are headed downhill. The brakes on the 3/4 ton truck might last for another couple hundred feet... but they won't stop 20,000 lbs of weight moving downhill. Its just not going to happen.

perfect post. I agree 100 percent.

Good time to close this one
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Old 10-10-2014, 08:29 PM   #37
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Ok, man, got way off track here.

I have an Ecoboost and it tows very well. I have no concerns for safety, but like said I'm not trying to win any races. Just want to be safe.

I believe with a 1500/150 level truck, you will run out of payload/GVWR before you reach your GCWR or max towing capability.

I am very intrigued by the new 6.4 L Hemi in a 2500. I don't think the cost/maintenance/gas vs the towing are beneficial for a diesel.

But like everyone has said, I think it's up to you. If you look at all your limits and pick a TV that meets these needs, you'll be happy.
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:05 PM   #38
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http://www.tfltruck.com/2013/10/unsa...vealed-part-1/

Have fun checking out the above post
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Old 10-11-2014, 07:35 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by spoon059 View Post
If you are towing 100% of the time, this is probably true. I would venture a guess that most people towing with 1/2 ton trucks probably tow less than 3000 miles per year, or less than 25% of the time. Modern half tons with the appropriate gearing and engine, using appropriate WDH and trailers with brakes will do fine up to around 8000 or so lbs. Just like anything else, you need the proper gear and a competent driver. An idiot pulling 1000 lbs behind a 1 ton can cause a lot more carnage than an experienced driver with an overweight truck...

People get all bent out of shape with a 7200 lbs GVWR truck pulling a 8000 lbs trailer. They talk about the "tail wagging the dog" and speculate on what will happen if the trailer brakes fail.

Ironically, these are the same people usually towing a 12,000 lbs trailer with a 8800 lbs GVWR truck. Somehow a trailer that weighs 800 lbs more than the truck is too much... but a trailer that is 3200 lbs more is ok. The half ton trucks brakes are going to fail if the 8000 lbs trailer brakes fail... but the 3/4 or 1 ton trucks will be able to stop the 12,000 lbs trailer.

That doesn't make sense to me.

Short of towing with a HDT, if your trailer brakes fail you are out of luck if you are headed downhill. The brakes on the 3/4 ton truck might last for another couple hundred feet... but they won't stop 20,000 lbs of weight moving downhill. Its just not going to happen.
The brakes of a HD truck may not be tons better but I can set my diesel to engine brake at any speed I want and it'll do it with my 12K lb load until I turn it off.

Also, I wouldn't ever advocate towing over max weight. It's a major legal issue. Wait until you get in a wreck. If they find out any component of you rig was overweight, you will be liable wether it's your fault or not. Also, your TV is only as good as the weakest link - the transmission. You may think you truck is ok, but your tranny will fail earlier than it would have had you not overloaded it. Talk to any tranny shop. I highly recommend not towing over gross weight. Even if you think you guys are "good enough to handle it".
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Old 10-11-2014, 07:44 AM   #40
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I have towed our white hawk unloaded at 6200lbs with my 5.3 1500 and max towing package rated for 7200. It pulled the trailer but was not conformable and gas mileage was terrible. Purchased a 2500hd gas and just towed with water and loaded, probably 7000lbs plus the family and full fuel, firewood and grill. At 65-70 and 1800-2100rpms until I hit 55South just south of Chicago I was getting 11.6mpg. Once I hit the constant incline rpm stayed constant around 2300-2500 and dropped to 11.1mpg. So I would suggest getting a 3/4 ton. Worth the investment. Plenty of power when you need. At times I forget the trailer is even behind the truck.
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