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Old 05-18-2016, 09:20 AM   #11
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I have a GM 3500HD gasser as noted in my sig. The 6.0 tows our 28BHBE without any issues. Picked it up for 34k Canadian in 08. Sure we slow down a bit on steeper grades but that is more due to my driving style than anything else. I can climb a 10% grade at 90kph if I want to push it. TT usually tips scales at 8800-9000 lbs. We have a 3752lb payload capacity so lots of room for toys etc.
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Old 05-18-2016, 10:32 AM   #12
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Towing capacity depends on a lot of factors beyond the drivetrain. The chassis stiffness, braking capability, and the sheer weight of the TV are all important factors as well. You don't want your TT or 5er pushing your tow vehicle around, especially on downhills. For 10k lb trailer weight, I can highly recommend a diesel on a 3/4T or 1T chassis. I owned a Chevy crew cab 4X4 Silverado with Duramax and Allison for my trailer with GVWR of 10,400. I often towed that toy hauler in the range of 9000-9500 lbs, on a stock drivetrain. It was an early version LB7, with about 535 lb-ft of torque. Today's versions of that are well over 700 lb-ft. Even if you end up with a low mileage used one, I'd strongly urge you to consider a diesel rather than any 1/2 ton pickup.
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Old 05-18-2016, 10:41 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texanrebel View Post
Another reason tundra is lower cause toyota is using a new standard for towing numbers the other truck makers havent gone too yet,
Actually, per this GM Release they are now using the new standard for setting the tow rating for the '16 HD's. Nothing has changed drivetrain wise since '11 except the 3.73 gearing is no longer available, only the 4.10's. So a specific '11-'15 truck that is the exact same configuration as a '16 will have the same tow ratings.

But trying to compare. 1500/150 series truck vs a 2500/3500 is an apples vs oranges situation.

TWP,

What axle ratio do you have?
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Old 05-18-2016, 10:48 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Dustdevil View Post
Towing capacity depends on a lot of factors beyond the drivetrain. The chassis stiffness, braking capability, and the sheer weight of the TV are all important factors as well. You don't want your TT or 5er pushing your tow vehicle around, especially on downhills. For 10k lb trailer weight, I can highly recommend a diesel on a 3/4T or 1T chassis. I owned a Chevy crew cab 4X4 Silverado with Duramax and Allison for my trailer with GVWR of 10,400. I often towed that toy hauler in the range of 9000-9500 lbs, on a stock drivetrain. It was an early version LB7, with about 535 lb-ft of torque. Today's versions of that are well over 700 lb-ft. Even if you end up with a low mileage used one, I'd strongly urge you to consider a diesel rather than any 1/2 ton pickup.
By the way, the diesels generally come with 3.73 axles, because those engines naturally run at slower speeds and develop their torque at lower speed ranges. 3.73 is also a slightly stronger gearset. Having said that, if your heart is set on a gasser, I would go with 4.10 axle gearing, as it is far more likely you could keep that engine in the higher rpm range where the gassers find max torque.
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:12 AM   #15
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I notice GM & Ford will only put a 3.73 rear axle in their T PUs(pickups). A 4.10 rear axle would better for towing.
F150 with max towing can tow 12k lbs (on paper). Payload will make it impossible to tow your 10K tt. (previous experience)

With the tt weight as well as the ultimate tongue weight, even on flat roads with no wind, a tt/tv with a 1/2 ton will be an accident waiting to happen.

We upgraded to the F250. See signi below. We ordered it with everything we needed to tow 12K lbs with plenty of payload left over at 3,600 lbs; most trucks on the lot had the 3.73 axle, but with special order, we could get the 4.30.

Previously, we had a half ton for better mileage with our previous 7,500# (loaded) 30'1/2" tt with a tongue weight of 1,100lbs so we could stay withing the range of 13%-15% of weight on the tongue. It didn't leave room for 'stuff' in the truck bed, and minimal weight in the front bedroom cabinets or front outside storage.

Hope our experience helps some
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