Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-29-2015, 05:30 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 128
I just bought the 2015 the Jayflight 28bhbe (great trailer). I had them put a weight distribution hitch on my truck. It distributes the weight over the whole truck not just the back, so my truck does not squat. It has the hitch and then two armlike things with chains (kind of works like the handles on a wheel barrel to distribute the weight). I am running 2013 F-150 ecoboost with towing capacity (per manufacturer) of 9,200. The weight of the trailer is approx. 6100 (not fiberglass option, fiberglass makes it heavier approx. 7100 with fiberglass option) with capacity to 9200. I figure with it full of all our stuff I am looking at about 7,200 pounds towing. Maybe want to look into that weight distribution hitch.

You have hit the nail on the head...my truck is "rated" to pull 10,000 lbs vs yours at 9,200 lbs. But what is your payload capacity and GVWR? The weight distributing hitch is "shifting" weight from the rear axle of the tow vehicle to the front axle of the truck and the trailer axles to help it ride level and take some strain off the back end.

When you do the math and add up the weight of the truck itself, the people and the options on the truck including the weight distributing hitch, and the trailer tongue weight (advertised at 610 lbs but likely higher) how much does it all weigh? This is where I am hitting a number greater than the GVWR, in my case 6900 lbs. I am under on the GCVWR and the GAWR's

Any chance you can provide the trailer yellow tag weight for that 28BHBE?
__________________

TommyAjax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2015, 06:00 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Portland
Posts: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyAjax View Post
I just bought the 2015 the Jayflight 28bhbe (great trailer). I had them put a weight distribution hitch on my truck. It distributes the weight over the whole truck not just the back, so my truck does not squat. It has the hitch and then two armlike things with chains (kind of works like the handles on a wheel barrel to distribute the weight). I am running 2013 F-150 ecoboost with towing capacity (per manufacturer) of 9,200. The weight of the trailer is approx. 6100 (not fiberglass option, fiberglass makes it heavier approx. 7100 with fiberglass option) with capacity to 9200. I figure with it full of all our stuff I am looking at about 7,200 pounds towing. Maybe want to look into that weight distribution hitch.

You have hit the nail on the head...my truck is "rated" to pull 10,000 lbs vs yours at 9,200 lbs. But what is your payload capacity and GVWR? The weight distributing hitch is "shifting" weight from the rear axle of the tow vehicle to the front axle of the truck and the trailer axles to help it ride level and take some strain off the back end.

When you do the math and add up the weight of the truck itself, the people and the options on the truck including the weight distributing hitch, and the trailer tongue weight (advertised at 610 lbs but likely higher) how much does it all weigh? This is where I am hitting a number greater than the GVWR, in my case 6900 lbs. I am under on the GCVWR and the GAWR's

Any chance you can provide the trailer yellow tag weight for that 28BHBE?

The problem you are having is why I stayed away from the Ram 1500 trucks even though I prefer Ram over Ford. They just have too low of payload capacity. In my opinion the 28bhe will overload your Ram 1500 by a lot.
__________________

__________________
2016 23MBH Elite
2014 F150 SCREW LB Ecoboost
blderman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 05:56 AM   #23
Junior Member
 
peobey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Oromocto, New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 21
Wouldn't adding all the extra cargo that normally rides in the truck into the RV be beneficial to the TV?
__________________
2015 JayFlight 28BHBE
2014 Gulfstream Gulfbreeze 24RBH (Junk, traded)
2004 Suzuki XL-7 (Old tow vehicle)
peobey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 06:22 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 143
So we have a 28BHBE and are towing with a Tundra. So far our trips have been within 4 hours of home. One with significant hills. We tow with a Tundra with a 5.7, 10,500 tow rating and just shy of 1600 payload. We need to hit the scale but I'm guessing we are over payload by a bit but I don't think it is to much based on numbers from people with the same trailer. While I'd love to be towing it with a bigger truck and that may happen down the road right now we own the Tundra and it has been doing the job without any concerns. We take it to DC in June and MI in July so those will be our big trips and maybe I'll change my mind. We feel in love with the 28BHBE and it fit our family perfectly. After extensive research here and on the Toyota boards we determined it was within the margins of what the truck could do safely. We went with it because I don't want to be looking to upgrade again in 18 months like I did with our PUP. We wanted to make sure we got the TT we were going to keep for many years to come. So as of right now we feel good about our combination but if that changes we would look at other trucks.
__________________
2015 Jay Flight 28BHBE
upgrading from Palomino Yearling 4102 Popup
2008 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 5.7 4x4 full tow package
MommieMara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 06:41 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by peobey View Post
Wouldn't adding all the extra cargo that normally rides in the truck into the RV be beneficial to the TV?
The problem is that I am hitting the GVWR of the truck just by putting the family into it and hooking up the trailer - nothing else in the truck. The law says that I can't put the wife or kids into the trailer when it is in motion...also doesn't say that I can't strap them to the roof of the trailer...hmmmm
TommyAjax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 07:09 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
UPCamper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: The Mitten
Posts: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyAjax View Post
Hi Everyone,

Would like to ask if anyone is using a Ram 1500 as a tow vehicle? I bought a 2014 1500 Sport 4x4 with 3.92 gearing last fall with the plan of upgrading from my Jayco pop-up to a travel trailer. Now that I am doing the math, I have realised that I am bumping up against the payload capacity for the truck if I get anything with more than a 550-600 lb tongue weight even though the advertising pumps "pull up to 10,000 lbs".

The GVWR of the Ram is 6900 lbs and I had it weighed today with a full tank of gas and me sitting in it and came out to 6000 lbs. That leaves me 900 lbs for wife, two kids, and the hitch. Figure about 250 lbs for the wife and kids, 65 lbs for the hitch leaves me at 585 lbs for the trailer.

We would like to get the Jay Flight 28BHBE which has a 610 lb tongue weight according to the brochure. Can my Ram safely handle this trailer? The GAWR has room, the GCVWR has room, but the payload is the issue. Would I get a ticket if I was slightly over? Has anyone been cited for being overweight on the tow vehicle payload capacity?

Looking for any insight that the group can offer...thanks
I don't drive a Ram so I can't offer any insight into the towing experiance. IMO though, if that truly is the tongue weight, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Realize that there could be, under very remote circumstances, be a liability issue should you get into a wreck and be at fault AND they look into payload capacity and actual tongue weight.

I don't believe people normally get cited for this though from weigh stations. Those places primarily look at axle weight as they drive over scales. Think about it, for them to nail you for it, they would have to look at your individual truck sticker, calculate payload, weigh your family and contents, unhitch your trailer, weight the actual tongue weight and then make a determination. All while there is a line up building down the highway. In other words, they aren't going to waste time checking payload on normal use vehicles UNLESS there is a specific reason ie: accident. Then it probably wont happen but it's possible.

I'm not saying do it, I'm just saying I personally wouldn't be worried about that small of a difference if everything else is within limits.

ALSO SHOULD MENTION - I have yet to find a trailer that weighs what a brochure says. My newest fifth wheel is significantly heavier (overall) than what the brochure says. It's tough to make choices based on close weights without the actual unit.
UPCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 07:25 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommieMara View Post
So we have a 28BHBE and are towing with a Tundra. So far our trips have been within 4 hours of home. One with significant hills. We tow with a Tundra with a 5.7, 10,500 tow rating and just shy of 1600 payload. We need to hit the scale but I'm guessing we are over payload by a bit but I don't think it is to much based on numbers from people with the same trailer. While I'd love to be towing it with a bigger truck and that may happen down the road right now we own the Tundra and it has been doing the job without any concerns. We take it to DC in June and MI in July so those will be our big trips and maybe I'll change my mind. We feel in love with the 28BHBE and it fit our family perfectly. After extensive research here and on the Toyota boards we determined it was within the margins of what the truck could do safely. We went with it because I don't want to be looking to upgrade again in 18 months like I did with our PUP. We wanted to make sure we got the TT we were going to keep for many years to come. So as of right now we feel good about our combination but if that changes we would look at other trucks.
We feel the same way. We bought our PUP about 5 years ago when the kids were toddlers...now the kids are getting bigger and lack of easily accessible storage in the PUP is driving the wife, and in turn me, crazy. Time to upgrade to a TT. I bought the truck last year in anticipation of the larger trailer and went by the tow ratings (10,000 lbs) thinking that I would get a 6,000 lb trailer and by the time I throw on some water and cargo I might max out around 7,500 lbs giving me a 2,500 lbs cushion for going up/down the big hills.

As I have mentioned, I am good on all of the numbers except for the GVWR if I go with the 28BHBE.

The GCWR is 15,650 lbs and if I say the trailer is 7,500 lbs full loaded, put the wife and kids in the truck, I have a TGCW of 13,800 so well under.

Both axles are rated to 3900 lbs - Cat Scale says that my front is at 3380 and rear is 2620 lbs, so with tuning the WDH I should be able to stay well under their capacity when adding the trailer.

Tires are rated as 114S which shows they can handle 2,600 lbs so 5,200 lbs per axle so I seem to be okay there.

But the GVWR is 6900 lbs. The scale showed the truck with me in it and full tank of gas was at 6000lbs. This is where I am stuck when I add 350 lbs for the wife, kids, and WDH. It would leave only 550 lbs for the tongue weight.

Not sure why the GCWR of 6900 lbs when the axle ratings would indicate 7800 lbs (3900 x 2).

Even the NHTSA towing guide is confusing:
U.S. Department of Transportation - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) - Towing A Trailer, Being Equipped for Safety - Title Page and Table of Contents - DOT HS 809 433 - April 2002
GVWR is defined as the "Amount the tow vehicle may weigh when fully loaded". They also state "Remember that the gross axle weight rating listed on the tow vehicle’s certification label must not be exceeded."
The wording on the axle rating is much more forceful than the GVWR and so does that mean that I am okay as long as I don't exceed them (gives me an extra 900 lbs when properly balanced with WDH)

And the GCWR is defined as the "Permissible combined weight of the tow vehicle, trailer, passengers, equipment, fuel, etc., that the vehicle can handle".

I am slowly reaching the conclusion that I would be fine with a 750 lbs hitch weight (when fully loaded) and a good WDH. I would be well under on the GCWR and GAWR, and only slightly over the GVWR when the gas tank is full. Still going to look at other trailer options with lighter hitch weights since we don't plan on buying until the fall...

I really appreciate all of the feedback...thanks
TommyAjax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 07:39 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Owensboro, KY
Posts: 239
Great site country mouse. Here's another I have found useful. I ended upgrading My TV also due to Silverado 5.3 being a little too anemic on hills for my TT. Initially looked at 2500 but found the added cost to go to a 3500 was only about $1200 so I sprung for the extra. I hope to upgrade to a larger 5th wheel down the road.
Travel Trailer Weight Calculator
__________________
2015 Jayco 27DSRL (Sold and shopping for new 5er)
2016 Little Guy CIRRUS 800 Truck Camper
2015 GMC SLT 3500 Duramax Crew Cab, SRW
KYCAMPER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 09:31 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 128
As I continue to read up on this, on some other forums people have claimed that a WDH will reduce the tongue weight load on the tow vehicle by re-distributing some of that weight back to the trailer axles (same concept that has the front axles taking some of the load from the rear axles of the truck).

So my next question is, does the WDH reduce the weight applied to the tow vehicle as payload? For example, if the tongue weight is 600 lbs, and the WDH redistributes that weight among the axles as 1/3 to each, the tow vehicle would take on 400 lbs of payload/hitch weight (200 lbs each to the front and rear), and the trailer axles take 200 lbs of the payload weight to be applied against the trailer payload capacity and not the tow vehicle.

Edit: this is supported by the example provided by CamperBob

Weigh 2: Truck with TT connected, WDH bars disengaged
Steer Axle: 2900
Drive Axle: 3680
Trailer Axle: 6660
Total: 13240 - Truck GVW = 6580 lbs, TT = 6660 lbs

Weigh 3: Truck with TT connected, WDH bars engaged
Steer Axle: 3200
Drive Axle: 3260
Trailer Axle: 6780
Total: 13240 - Truck GVW = 6460 lbs, TT = 6780 lbs

So the WDH "shifted" 120 lbs back onto the TT and reduced the truck payload by that amount.
TommyAjax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2015, 10:02 AM   #30
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Spring Hill
Posts: 16
Toyota Tacoma long bed TV?

Hi everyone,

Is anyone towing with a Tacoma Long Bed V6 truck? My TV is an F350, but a friend wants to get into TT's that he could tow with his Tacoma. Any suggestions as to trailer size?

Thanks,
__________________

__________________
Rog and Jan
2007 Designer 36 RLTS
2012 F350 Lariat SRW 6.7PS
trainer51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.